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Constante's Decision


Evangeline Anovilis
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Confidential

 

While the tension was rising in Europe, even though most likely at most half of all information came to Mihaela Constante's attention, this half was more than enough to cause worries. But just as it was worrying how Europe's security fell apart, as much did Constante start to hate the internal weaknesses of her own country. Terrorism had killed Maria, since then, hardly anything had been achieved, except for what she herself had done. In fact, since the old Queen was dead, the country had entered the worst crisis since Babylon was alive. Vlasceanu was an old and rather reluctant actor, whom Maria had favoured, as he pretty much just went with the Queen's agenda and never made one of his own. In the absence of the Queen, he was a complete roadblock to initiative though. And the new Queen... well, Constante wondered no longer why Maria was never thrilled by this sort of succession.

 

For a few days now already, Constante had contemplated her options. Most likely, it would be better to for her and for the nation, if there were a few changes in the cabinet. Though she was not thrilled by what pretty much amounted to usurpation, there wasn't really much else that could be done. In the end, someone had to be active. Someone had to be Romania's strength. Someone had to bring up the determination to restore order and beat the dissenters into it, if need be.

 

As Mihaela Constante tried to find a way to work out a way of effectively achieving the objectives of hers in foreign policy and in the ranks of Bucharest's elite, suddenly, a phone call came in. Picking up, it was one of her allies in the Siguranța, informing her of a success against the Maoists. Seemingly, the organisation had been infiltrated successfully and information on its membership had been obtained. For a moment, Constante was about to congratulate and just hang up, given that she currently had other things to do, before she thought the matter over and requested just a small favour...

 

[hr]

 

The next morning, the newspaper was filled with the news, the Maoists had received a stunning blow. Infiltrators of the Siguranța had compiled a list of the membership and had conducted a large-scale purge of the organisation, with over three hundred arrests on the first day alone. What however also was shocking, was that seemingly, Prime Minister Vlasceanu had retired, leaving the position for his long-time protegé Constante. The exact reasons were unknown, though many had felt that Vlasceanu lacked what it needed to be Prime minister in the first place and welcomed, when he announced that he would hand over the leadership to people with a fresh outlook in these dire times.

 

Little did they know, that Radu Vlasceanu, the Prime minister's son, had appeared on the list to be purged. But little did they need to know...

 

[hr]

 

Over the next days, political purges and rochades in the upper echelons of Romania's leadership would amount to pretty much a coup d'état, a takeover by Constante and her allies. Though, the new Prime minister could build on broad support by the old allies of the aristocracy, on political allies in the Siguranța and in the military, as well as on the ineptitude of opposition. In the face of foreign threat and internal decay, it was easy to appear as the saviour of the nation, when the Queen was dead and the political system an autocracy to begin with. While the new Queen was away, Constante hardly stopped in her accumulation, rather the autocracy of old would be transformed into a modern autocracy, of the Front Unit Naționale.

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A whole Romanian carrier fleet, consisting of fleet carrier Dacia, escorted by destroyers Mărăști and Vaslui and frigates Regina Maria, Regele Carol II, Domn Vlad II and Domn Vlad III, as well as the battleships Oltenia and Basarabia would depart from their homeports in Constantinopol and the Black Sea, to the Strait of Otranto. For the time being, they would intercept all transport, de facto establishing a blockade.

 

Meanwhile, a public statement would be made, though clearly adressed to Belgrade.
 

It pains me, that one of my first acts in my new position is one of such nature. However, far too long, our nation has left unadressed the threats that exist. The Kralj of Yugoslavia, a state we had treated with respect and friendliness up to now, has sadly, in the most recent diplomatic exchange, made it clear, that to him, our nation is not a friend, but a hurdle, and that Yugoslavia has chosen to support Alvonia in its policy of undermining our country. The Romanian Kralj, has refused our offer of friendship, in his misguided attempt to strengthen anti-Romanianism, sources of instability, in the hope to further his own position and his position in relation to our allies in Carthage. These developments pose a genuine threat to our national security. Even worse, the Kralj is building up forces in Yugoslavia, by having foreigners station their troops in yugoslav territory. While some may find it amusing that African troops are invited to Europe by a country advocating anti-Africanism, I find this only the more disturbing and proof of the hypocrisy exercised by Belgrade. A hypocrisy, we, as a state, and I, as its leader, cannot tolerate to let go on. Thus, today, I have ordered the deployment of a Romanian fleet to the Strait of Otranto, in order to close of this waterway to any non-allied traffic. If the Kralj has thought we would look away, as he overtly builds up his forces for a war with our country, it is now my duty to correct him.

 

We thus, demand of the regime in Belgrade, that within 6 hours, foreign troops start withdrawing from Yugoslavia, with withdrawal completed within at most 24 hours. Failure to comply, will result in armed action to remove the threat posed to our nation. Romania has offered cooperation, Yugoslavia has chosen confrontation. We will not back down.

 

Signed,

Mihaela Constante, Conducătora and Regent of Greater Romania

Edited by Evangeline Anovilis
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Confidential

 

General Golescu was hardly enjoying this. In front of his, a detailed map of the Banat, lists of troop deployments, communications equipment and a letter. The order from Constante to get moving. "How did we end up here?", he muttered. It seemed Belgrade had chosen to ignore the ultimatum and war was inevitable. At least that was what Constante had written. Honestly, these were most likely the worst times in revent times. But what could Golescu do? He was a general, yes. But the secret police knew where he and his family was at all times. The people would remember his acts, when the country died and overall, there was only so much he could achieve. Most likely, Constante too, knew that this was no longer the time of tea and Joffre cake. She hardly would go this far, if this matter would not require it, Golescu thought. Harsh times require harsh measures... Golescu gave the order to attack.

 

[hr]

 

Confidential

 

The I. Romanian Army under Golescu and the II. Romanian Army under Laicu had been stationed in the region already during the Hungarian crisis, but it was now that they saw action. The plan had already been prepared years ago, when tensions had arosen due to Sparta and Milan, a plan that had continuously been updated to reflect new circumstances. In its latest version, it now served as the basis for the offensive against Yugoslavia.

 

Banat Offensive

 

Over 440,000 Romanian soldiers, of the combined two field armies, would be involved in the action. The first signs of the impending attack would be a fair number of RQ-11s, that would be launched by the Romanian Army, to scout the Serbian side of the border for possible enemy deployments. These small and rather inexpensive drones would be joined after a few minutes by ALAS-B missiles, which, due to their special guidance mode, would allow for even deeper reconnaissance, up to 60 km inland, before targetting high-value targets of opportunity, such as tanks, supply and fuel depots, electricity grids, static radar dishes, artillery emplacements and other such vulnerable assets.

 

Of course, these reconnaissance assets would not be the sole action to be taken, as the Army started to cross the border in a large-scale offensive, once the territory directly in front of them had been scouted. This would come as a two-pronged offensive, with the I. Romanian Army advancing via Timișoara, into the Northern Banat, bypassing Kikinda by advcing South of it, while the II. Romanian Army was to advance from Reșița to Vršac, with orders to later advance onwards to Zrenjanin. These would however be of course merely the plans, subject to change if necessary.

 

Although the Romanian Army planned to advance quickly and with relative ease towards the Yugoslav interior (also given that Yugoslavia had quite little time to actually react to the ultimatum), overrunning Serbia in the process, it was expected that several Yugoslav army units would stand inbetween Romania and its victory. Depending on target, the Romanian Army would use different approaches. Small targets that posed little resistence (like border patrouilles) were left to the armoured units to crush as they advanced. Hardened targets meanwhile, that threatened to stop the advance, would be subjected to precision strikes, with the Romanian Army firing a couple of Krasnopol 155 mm laser-guided extented range precision rounds on these, which would hopefully do the job. Any actual resistence though, in form of larger troop contingents, would be seeing a vastly different approach. ATROM and LAROM artillery batteries would be used on any larger formations in the field in pretty much saturation attacks. ATROM self-propelled howitzers would utilise Multiple-Round-Simultanous-Impact (MRSI) to fire a 3 round burst within 15 seconds, before disengaging and redeploying, to avoid counter-battery fire. With batteries of 8 pieces and regiments of 5 batteries, between 24 and 120 155 mm HE-Frag shells would find its way to the target, with little warning and near-simultanous impact. LAROM rocket artillery with its 32 barrels per piece and 8 units per battery would be no less devastating, as each battery could in little to no time fire its load of 256 rockets, each containing 104 bomblets to cover wide areas with a carpet of explosives. While maybe not too accurate, it was not all too easy to not get hit once a fire mission of these was called in.

 

On the frontlines, the Romanian Army would advance with a balance of caution and rapid movement. The first to advance would be the mountain divisions, the vânători de munte. Although they were not fighting in mountains this time around, they still were an elite unit, with special training, high esprit de corps and a specialisation in light infantry tactics, making them suited for the task. Their task would not be to directly engage enemy units actually, but to simply use their low profile as light infantry to by-pass the Yugoslav units in the field, penetrate into the rear, and engage targets, such as anti-tank emplacements, anti-aircraft missiles, radar sites, communications and command structures. For this, they would operate in rather small groups, though adequate in size to fulfill their task in harassing the enemy.

 

More attention would most likely be drawn to the units immediatly following the mountain infantry, the armoured and mechanised divisions. These units would depend on the vânători de munte to report any encountered hostile position, which would either be passed on to artillery, or be directly engaged by the armoured units. Unless engaging a target, these units would travel in smaller units, to avoid being an easy target for their enemy, though their high mobility would mean they could easily regroup, if the situation required it.

 

Lastly, there would be the normal motorised infantry units, following behind, awaiting further orders, once enemy units were encountered.

 

To protect against aircraft, a number of Su-35s were launched, staying a good bit behind the combat lines for the moment, though the main anti-air effort came from the deployment of multiple long-range and medium range radar sites, which would be backed up by several still turned-off additional radars, and surface-to-air missile systems, such as the S-400 in the rear, Buk immediatly behind combat units and the Pantsir, employed with units at the front to take out ground-attack aircraft and pesky helicopters.

 

Otranto Blockade

 

The naval forces at the Otranto strait would move back to Constantinopol, to rendez-vous with the rest of the fleet. They would be replaced by the six nuclear attack submarines of the Romanian fleet, which would start mining the Strait. A public announcement was made on these mining operations, though with little more detail than that it was not recommended to pass through the Straits anymore. It was decided, that it sufficed for the first few ships to sink due to naval mines and torpedoes, to get the message across to the Yugoslavs that the disappearance of the surface fleet did not lift the blockade.

 

[hr]

 

Lastly, a message would be publicly sent to Belgrade.

 

 

Given the government in Belgrade has seen it fit to ignore our demands from 6 hours ago, we hereby inform you that we see our countries from now on, until the conclusion of hostilities, as in a state of war with each other.

 

Signed,

Mihaela Constante, Conducătora and Regent of Greater Romania

 

The war had begun.

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With the war declared an event that many within Carthage had hoped to not occur did so anyway. Realizing it to most likely be a futile scenario some eleventh hour diplomacy would need to be attempted to prevent as much bloodshed as possible.

 

In line with this a message would be sent addressed to Romania and Yugoslavia, the contents of the message were made public so everyone could see them.

 

To the governments of Yugoslavia and Romania,

 

With war on Europe's shores once again it seems we are all facing a threat of unprecedented proportions, whatever happens millions will lose their lives and many more will be left homeless or worse. In a final attempt to conclude this agreement peacefully I call upon both your states to enact a ceasefire and engage in a conference on neutral ground to discuss the situation and come to a peaceful resolution.

 

-Anysus I of Carthage

 

 

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"Greater Romania is willing to engage in a dialogue to conclude a peace agreement. We will however not agree to any ceasefire at the current moment, as such would one-sidedly strengthen the Yugoslav position during the negotiations. Furthermore, we would like to inquire what this 'neutral ground' is."

-Mihaela Constante, Conducătora and Regent of Greater Romania

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"These seem like reasonable locations, though, naturally, we will send an envoy solely if Yugoslavia accepts."

-Mihaela Constante, Conducătora and Regent of Greater Romania

 

Confidential

 

There was no great expectation that Yugoslavia would ever accept. But the offensive also had not been launched with the idea to get a quick surrender.

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*All troop movements and communications are assumed to be classified.*


The Republic's Mediterranean fleet, already called up on first contact with the Romanian forces, had been placed on high alert. It was a sad reality that warfare was inevitable, and the Republic preferred to be prepared. With its observational equipment tracking the movements of the Romanian fleet, the Republic's vessels had prepared their compliments of missiles and aircraft for launch at a moment's notice-- while both carriers kept a defensive screen of aircraft in flight at all times.


The call came, not unexpectedly, just as the Romanian fleet began to move. While the Republic had watched the territory of their ally, they had yet held out hope that the massed troop movements within Romania would pull back before crossing the Yugoslavian borders. It was when the Romanians crossed the border, and their ships turned away from the blockade, that the Republic struck.


Support and attack aircraft took the sky immediately, and a barrage of HARM missiles streaked their way across the sky toward Romania's fleet, leaving its commanders with the unenviable choice of deactivating the radar that allowed them to see the battlefield, or else guiding the missiles directly into their ships. Hot on the tail of of the initial anti-radar missiles came the true threat, as a second barrage of anti-ship missiles took to the air. Had the Romanians been acting with intelligence, and maintaining defensive flights, several of the Republic's attack craft would have launched their anti-air missiles.


The Republicans worked swiftly and without warning given to the Romanians. They had no cause to love the Romanians, nor to extend to them any courtesies. Romania had come to Yugoslavia with sword in hand, and the Republic came with missiles.


***


Colonel Akoki stood, with her hands folded at the small of her back, in the heart of Yugoslavia's defensive command center. The Yugoslavs rushed through the facility, which had become a hive of activity with the Romanian invasion. She cast a glance at her counterpart, the Yugoslavian regent.


"Regent," she spoke brusquely, "Republic intelligence shows that the Romanian advance is utilizing large numbers of infantry and armour in their assault. I suggest that you keep your men in their positions, and utilize your artillery against their advance. It seems that they have chosen not to initiate the invasion with proper aerial or artillery strikes, and I see your network is operational. If you would be so kind, please make them pay before engaging at a troop level. Your maps indicate that the combat zone is open plains; a poor choice for such an advance against an enemy with intact defenses."


She shook her head once, almost pitying the Romanian soldiers who had made their way into the meat grinder that was Yugoslavia. It was almost as though the Romanian commanders had expected to catch the nation unawares, unprepared to protect itself, as though it had not endured assault by Sparta, and threat by Romania itself.


***


"We've sorted out the Romanian observational satellites from the others. We've got clear target locks, and are ready to launch." The commander of the Republic's missile base gave a curt nod and issued the order. Anti-satellite missiles raced skyward, brilliant lances of fire that would knock the Romanian satellite network out of operation, and clear of the paths of other national satellite networks.


OOC Note: 4 HARM type missiles, and 4 Harpoon type missiles are being launched per fighter at Eva’s ships; if she’s got her own fighters in the air, that leaves 3 AIM-120 AMRAAMs from each of my fighters. I’ve got a total of 96 Superhornets in the air as of this post. I’ve also got 3 E-767’s in the air.

 

OOC Edit: Ship numbers- 2 Nimitz, 2 Ticonderoga, 5 Arleigh-Burke, 5 Oliver Hazard Perry, 2 modernized Iowa. Ships are broken up into two CSGs and two SAGs. Defensive formations and whatnot.

Edited by Yerushalayim
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Private

 

In the heart of Beograd, the White City of the Serbs, Beli Dvor


Petar let out a sigh as he stood in the middle of a veritable swarm of activity, soldiers and technicians of the Kingdom ran to and fro in their duties. The Regent stood in the heart of His command center, dozens of maps, charts and lists glowing on screens around him, listing the mobilizations and movements of the Kingdom's forces. The entire facility had been on the maximum security lock down ever since the arrest of their Kralj, officers rushing past him as they spoke rapidly into their headsets. The Kingdom had been on maximum alert ever since His arrest by the cowardly dogs of Sparta, activity and orders being sent to all garrisons within the Kingdom, bringing everything the Kingdom had on maximum alert. The threat from Romania was expected given their paranoid nature, it had only shocked a few in the leadership but the rest had taken it in stride and chose to ignore it in favor of fortifying their Kingdom for the coming siege.


For first time since its rise from the anarchy that had plagued the world, the Kingdom would go to war and without Him leading them.


Petar hated the circumstances, hated that the Romanians were so self-centered to delude themselves in their superiority, self-interests and absurd amount of paranoia, hated that Sparta had remained loyal as a cowardly dog to Carthage and hated that Carthage itself was the catalyst for the harm that would befall on Yugoslavia for having dared opposed it. Still, the Kingdom was not weak and it was certainly not leaderless as he glanced at his eldest son, Milenko, who barked orders as he roamed through the command center like a bucking bronco, righteous fury likely coursing through his son.


The rest of the Council were present but would soon be moved elsewhere to be kept safe, Petar sincerely hoped that where they would be hidden from would keep them safe from what was about to come.


The Regent glanced at the woman besides him, stoic as she was in the face of the hurricane surrounding the duo. She was the de-facto leader of the Great Lakes Republic’s infamous ‘Pacification Squads’ within the Kingdom, the same squads who had brought the anarchy in their ally’s land to a complete stop, leading to the Great Lakes Republic eventual formation under Queen Akinyi. The woman was Colonel Mary Akoki and currently one of his closest military advisers on top of whatever else he had within his disposal.


Petar turned to the screen in front of him as he hoped that the God of Justice was truly with them, entering something the Queen of the Great Lakes Republic had asked for his participation via teleconference.


[hr]


After the teleconference


The regent gave a quick nod to the Colonel and barked out a series of orders towards his son, who in turn barked them even louder as technicians and officers yelled into headsets and phones as they gave the call. Petar could feel the age in his bones as the activity around them intensified, he saw no malice at the Republican Colonel for she had simply suggested what he had already intended to do and she was rightfully his adviser, thus he saw no reason to state that.


The call had came and everyone knew it was not unexpected, the forces of the Kingdom having been at maximum readiness to defend their homeland from the enemies that gathered around it. The brave soldiers of the Kingdom ready to do their duty for their captured Kralj and their Kingdom.


Artillery; already on alert due to the ultimatum, opened up when the first hints of Romanian incursion appeared. At first it was only anti-air weapons, firing upon the drones that raced across the border between the nations, but should Romania continue its mad dash toward destruction, missile and gun batteries would join the fray.


The emplacements, fortified and prepared for such an unpleasant contingency, tracked the Romanian formations as they came, launching missile after missile to streak off after the Romanians. Most were guided to home in on the heat and exhausts of the armoured vehicles in the initial advance, and some homed in on the radar being used by the Romanians in their defense. The vaunted speed of Romanian vehicles would not serve them well out in the open, where they had no cover, no protection, from the Yugoslavian bombardment.


Every inch the enemy advanced across would be fraught with peril, every step bringing the possibility of death from the sky. If the Romanians continued forward, they'd find themselves fighting through a hurricane of munitions, raining down across their vehicles, and wherever larger formations of men gathered.


The plains of the Banat would become a slaughter house. And the Romanians had yet to even reach the fortified positions of the Yugoslavian soldiers.


Elsewhere near the main military port of the Kingdom, the call had arrived as well and preparations had been done in the unfortunate event but the reality had turned things over their head with their former friendly neighbors trying to invade their home and blockade their allies from establishing themselves properly.


As such, the artillery and missile placements on the port of Korcula were aimed towards the straits of Otranto, where the Romanian blockade was located. The numerous ships that consisted of the entire Kingdom’s fleet were ordered to finally embark into the waters of the Adriatic, armed and equipped to the teeth for the survival of the Kingdom.


As the fleet moved out of port, they would move into Condition II, the sailors aboard each ship manning weapons and preparing to fight. RADAR installations aboard the ships would be brought online, but not put into transmit/receive mode, lest their location be prematurely betrayed by their own systems. Each ship would strive to make all communications via satellite comm, which, being directional, would be very difficult to locate via electronic support measures.


The carrier ship christened RF Tito was the command ship of the fleet, its assortment of naval aircraft alongside the carrier RF Dusan were patrolling the entire fleet as they sailed towards the Straits of Otranto.


The moment the Romanian blockade was within missile range, the fleet would come to a crawling halt before the entirety of the fleet’s air force was scrambled. The military emplacements on each ship would be aimed towards the Romanian ‘blockade’ thanks in part to the satellite intelligence provided by their ally, the Great Lakes Republic, as LM-Orao’s raced forward, firing their salvo of HARM towards the Romanian ships, the emplacements firing their own salvo’s of missiles dedicated entirely to sink the enemy ships. And now, with the attack going in, the fleet would light off their RADAR installations as well, so they could see the enemy themselves, and any attacks the enemy might launch against it.


The Kingdom of Yugoslavia would not go quietly into the night.

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Classified - Top Secret!

 

A single code phrase was sent to the Wehrmacht  - "Can't wait to see how it upsets them."

 

With that code phrase, Operation Hotel Istanbul began. The Marinestoßtruppregiment and Marine-Panzer Battalion left their base in Koper, advancing along the Yugoslavian plains to Vojvodina, the target of their operations, the area a request handed down from Yugoslavian command. The distance, some 402 kilometers away, was expected to take about two hours, with more time given to units that had the older Glocke Twin helicopters. The tanks would take even longer to arrive, as they had to drive overland to reach the operation zone. Of course, this effectively left the Marines without their heavy support weapons like their self-propelled anti-air guns and artillery until it could arrive.

 

As this happened, three divisions left Alvonia proper - the 6. Infanterie-Division, the 8. Infanterie-Division, and the 6. Panzer-Division, who along with them traveled 8,460 members of the Schwarze Korps in Sd.Kfz. 90 (s) and Sd.Kfz. 2 (a) transports. Also coming with these units were 140 ADATS systems, 25 Raketenartillerie Plattform Tod systems, 150 PzH 2000 systems, 50 Flakpanzers, 125 Raketenartilleripanzers, and enough munitions to kill everyone in the Czech states twice over. These divisions were on a similar mission to their Marine counterparts - move to Vojvodina and hold there until further notice.

 

Back in Alvonia itself, all divisions and outposts were notified to be on high alert for any possible retaliation. Nobody would catch Alvonia unawares this time.

 

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Highest Secrecy.

 

The following nations have been given ARES and GIGGITY network read-only access keys:

GLR,

Alvonia

Yugoslavia

Hungary

 

They were conveyed via spies that intentionally went to these nations from Druk Yul and whom intentionally blew their cover to the leaders of those states (no intelligence roll required, you found them). The delivery was made in person so as to mitigate risk of intercept by untrusted persons.

 

The keys may be toggled on and off by Druk Yul at any time.

Edited by Maelstrom Vortex
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Private:

 

Emperor Jesse was watching the news of the events taking place in Europe. He would tell Lee to put the Shanghai Military on High Alert in case the war ever made it to Asia. "We need to be ready in case the war does come to Asia. Although we may be safe for now there is no telling what could happen and I do not want a repeat of what happened when that "rogue" nuke hit Shanghai all those years ago. If anything looks like it is going to head in our direction I want to know as soon as it is launched or even sooner if possible."

 

"Yes sir."

Edited by jesbro
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Classified

 

With fighting in the Balkans rapidly escalating, the Belorussian government would decide that it was time to score a few relevance points. The Eleventh and Ninth Divisions, as well as 20,000 reservists, would be sent over to Romania in order to assist in the fighting.

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:Private:

The joint SATINT of the Anti Groping Coalition would easily notice the force movements, Kazuko sat thinking at the new intelligence for a moment, tapping her cheek with her pointer finger, "I wonder if they know what they're getting themselves into, the poor lads."

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Confidential

 

Mihaela Constante, when signing the documents authorising the offensive, had thought about the possibilities of a greater war. The sheer scale of escalation however, it was pretty much the most devastating turn events could have taken, and while the Regent and Minister of Foreign Affairs still was assessing the situation, the Romanian public had by all means been shocked. Within the shortest amount of time, the country was at war with maybe a dozen nations, most had lost count. But everyone knew, when you have enough adversaries that you need more than one hand and a few seconds of thinking to count them all, clearly, somewhere, something went horribly wrong.

 

But while many saw the course of events as problematic, to Constante, this was not the end. Indeed, it was problematic, but at the same time... it was not hopeless. Far from it.

 

Public

 

"Romanians! At this very moment, our proud nation, despite all efforts that have been conducted in the past few years, in order to prevent such disaster, finds itself at war, not solely with the people of of Yugoslavia, but also, with a coalition of powers, hailing from across the world, seemingly determined to crush our nation. We are facing a coalition, which cannot be taken lightly, neither in terms of forces at their disposal, nor in the kind of terms, which could be expected from such a foe.

 

The enemy has made it clear, that this war, is not like anything, we have seen in a long time. From its inception, this war, has broken with all protocol. Franco-Japanese action against our allies in Britain, has showed the furious and brutal nature of our foe in this struggle. With no reason, except for their desire for power, for revision of the status quo by force of arms, for supremacy over the free community of states, this enemy coalition has seen it preferable, to impose their will through military might, rather than diplomatic dialogue. The attack on Britain, by all means, is an attack, not just on our ally. It is an attack, on a set of a morals. On a set of beliefs. Our foe, sees it not as necessary anymore, to seek peacefully, what they think, they can gain by force. Where Britain, and Romania, have been arbiters and protectors of peace, trying to ensure, that those peoples who are less fortunate and prosperous, not be made subjects, by their more powerful neighbours, these states, now, have turned to a policy of 'might makes right'. The attack on the  United Kingdom, is in no way justified by any known standard. The reasons provided, are but poor cover for an agenda of revisionism. Under the guise of exercises, a coalition has conducted a large scale attack on a state, which has committed no crime, except to prevent rampant Franco-Alvonian expansionism. If such can ever be a crime.

 

And it is because of our beliefs, that we will not surrender, not give in. This is an hour of revelations, as we now see, the true nature of the beast. And we see, who it is, whom we can trust, and whom not. This war, by all means, will not be easy. It will cost many lives and many good people on both sides, will fall, as sacrifice to the greed of a few tyrants. But this, is not something I can spare you. This is not something that is negotionable. It is but a sad fact and it will need the concentrated action and support of the entire Romanian nation, to ensure for us, for our allies and for the world we believe in, the continued survival. We are not alone in this struggle, for we are fighting with Britain and Belarus against all odds. And not alone they shall be, as long as a single Romanian can lift their arm to strike. And I have all hope, that the sacrifice of our coalition will be remembered, that they will recall the hour of glory, when our people fought like lions, to bring down the pack of wolves in defense of all that is righteous and good in this world.

 

And I have also all due hope, that once this struggle is over, and once the victory has been secured against all odds, that there will be no need to ever the question 'Where have you been, in this hour of need, when our all freedom was about to be extinguished?' Romanians, our Queen might be dead, but the Romanian nation is not. And when we crown our next monarch, they shall still know, what it is, the Steel Crown stands for! May God bless our endeavours and grant us victory!"

 

[hr]

 

Confidential

 

Contraamiral Matteanu, commander of the fleet sent to blockade the Otranto Strait had barely managed to turn, in order to head back to Romania, when the first message came in from the Domn Vlad III, that a cluster of aircraft was approaching the fleet, though still at a distance. Immediatly, the ships would be readied for combat action and of the 10 fighters of the carrier air group that were currently in the air, two turned to engage the swarm and identify them, just to be downed by the AMRAAMs.

 

As the enemy aircraft approached the fleet further, the VLS cells of the four escorting destroyers would spring open, releasing a barrage of SM-6 surface-to-air missiles. With their superior range to the enemy anti-ship missiles, these missiles were set on a path that would allow interception at a "safe" distance of about 225 km, which was calculated as the best bet, as it'd mean that by the time the enemy aircraft were aware of the missiles heading for them, they'd be already in a massive pinch to get out, given the range, agility and incredible speed of the SM-6, not to mention that the enemy aircraft would need to still activate afterburner and make a turn, costing more than enough valuable time. All 128 missiles of the fleet would be fired, in order to protect the fleet, though the remaining over 400 medium range missiles would be readied too, to intercept whatever ASMs the enemy aircraft would be able to launch.
 

This however was not the sole threat to Matteanu's fleet, as the Yugoslav approach was duely noted. While dealing with the aircraft, Matteanu had ordered the fleet to steam away from the Yugoslav fleet, trying to get away, however, once the first threat had been dealt with, Matteanu, hoping to shake off the enemy, decided to give a warning shot. Trusting in the stand-off range of his anti-ship missiles, Matteanu would order a daring saturation strike, before turning to escape to Constantinopol, while the Yugoslavs would hopefully tend to the one or two ships that were sunk in such an attack. The fleet would let the Yugoslavs approach to around 250 km, before the submarine flotilla launched a volley of 240 3M-54 Klub anti-ship missiles. Timed to arrive at about the same time, a short while later, the two destroyers Mărăști and Vaslui launched their 32 Furtună (OOC: BrahMos) anti-ship missiles, before the fleet turned away, sailing for Constantinopol to rearm and refuel.

 

What Contraamiral Matteanu had not guessed, was that the seemingly inexperienced crews of the brand-new Yugoslav Navy had seemingly decided to put their radar on stand-by, which did not prevent them from being picked up by surface radar as the big floating pieces of steel they were, but would mean that spotting the sea-skimming missiles prior to the terminal phase would be pretty much impossible, leaving the Yugoslavs with over 270 supersonic anti-ship missiles to deal with... in the few seconds left where they could see them without radar. Chances were, the yugoslav Navy would be gone as fast as it had come into existence.

 

While Matteanu was steaming back, Amiral Marescu would be already close, under his command the High Seas Fleet, consisting out of carriers Fulgerul, RomâniaRândunica and the newly commissioned Aquila, destroyers Mărășești, Călugăreni, Plevna and Târgoviște (latter two being new ships), frigates Voievod Basarab I, Voievod Ioan de Hunedoara, Domn Mihai Viteazu, Voievod Radu Mihnea, Regele Carol, Regele Mihai, Regele Ferdinand and Alexandru Ioan Cuzca, as well as the battleships Oltenia and Basarabia, which would be transferred to Marescu's command from Matteanu, given they were still somewhat fresh, Moldavia, Bucovina, Ardeal, Muntenia, Dobrogea and Banat. As Matteanu reported his exploits, the Amiralty would now task Marescu with hunting down the enemy fleet that had launched 96 fighters against Romania and was clearly a threat to the maritime security. If these were not found, they would just continue to the Atlantic.

 

[hr]

 

OOC: Before anyone complains about the following, I'm going by what Rudolph and Ty gave me to work with. For a short overview of defensive works, here.

 

Confidential

 

As the Romanian army under General Golescu lost its first UAVs to anti-air emplacements, these emplacements would give away their position to Romanian artillery and would soon regret it, as they got pounded by 155 mm precision-guided shells. Most likely, the missile fired at the handheld UAVs would cost more than the UAV, the launcher that would get subjected to SEAD would cost even more. Meanwhile, more UAVs would be launched, affordable in great numbers. Apart from RQ-11s, now also RQ-7s would be launched, as it was hoped the Yugoslavs had learned their lesson on firing on recon drones.

 

Of course, on more issue for the Yugoslav anti-air capable of taking down drones (short-range), was that it would be quickly pushed to reatreat behind Yugoslav fortifications or get overrun by the Romanian army, if it stayed too long at the immediate border. Romanian Army units would meanwhile progress further, util they encountered the first obstacles. Czech hedgehogs, while a bit of a problem in towns, would not be much of an issue in a wide plain, where chokepoints were few and a few hedgehogs on a street could just be bypassed by tanks and other vehicles on the field or plain besides it.

 

As the Romanians progressed over the Plain, they would find themself subjected to incoming fire quickly, however, it was more than manageable. While the Yugoslavs thought they could just fire their missiles at Romanian vehicles, they first would need to get a lock on one, which required the missile to get into visual range. Until such a point, the missile would require wire-guidance to a target that the Yugoslavs would first need to spot. Problematic would also be the presence of Romanian short-range air defenses in form of the Pantsir, which would be set up every now and then, to protect the advancing units from such pesky cruise missile threats.

 

The first actual challenge would come, when the Romanians located the actualy emplacements of the Yugoslavs, who were seemingly waiting in trenches and opening fire on the Romanian units with their artillery. The advance would halt for a short moment (read, about 10 minutes), before the decision was made to withdraw a short distance and stay at least 15 km away from the Yugoslaw positions. Being out of visual range of the Yugoslavs and only in range of artillery, which seemed to lack a decent amount of reconnaissance and where either firing blind or on the few occassional targets that came ino range. However, as the Yugoslav emplacements fired, Romanian 203 mm 2S7 Pion heavy artillery would track back their trajectory to the gun emplacement and lay down counter-battery fire from stand-off ranges.

 

The decision was made, to systematically take apart the Yugoslav trench emplacements, as well as the troops stationed therein. At first, small units of specialised light infantry would approach the trenches, using whatever cover possible, to make out the enemy defences. Sadly, the first few stepped on anti-personal mines, alerting the rest that there was actually a minefield, though fresh. From then on, binoculars would be used, to look across the minefield. Once a sufficient idea of the enemy fortification in the Banat existed, the next step followed, as Romanian ATROM 155 mm self-propelled howitzers started to fire precision-guided rounds at the enemy trenches in the plains. With a CEP of solely a few metres, the improvised nature of Yugoslav trench construction and the quite brutal impact of MRSI bursts from entire batteries of ATROM, before they relocated, it was jokingly remarked by General Golescu that "the Yugoslav soldiers were not digging trenches. They were digging their own mass graves." In case any Yugoslav soldiers tried to actually leave the trenches and withdraw, LAROM rocket artillery would just be notified by the forward observers and on a moments notice cover whole areas with explosives, tearing apart whatever was not in the cover of a trench, as well as the funny walls the Yugoslavs had constructed. Not that these provided much cover from explosives from above.

 

Romanian towed guns meanwhile would be set up 15 km (152 mm) and 20 km (130 mm) from the Yugoslav units, where their crews would position them, camouflaging and entrenching them. These units would be put there for later. Using locations where bushes and trees gave cover, it wouldn't be too easy detecting these. Romanian Anti-air assets similarly would be emplaced in any newly occupied territory, so as to extent the anti-air umbrella over the area. Once all was set up, the 152 mm howitzers would join in on the slaughterfest, while the 130 mm guns were on standby, providing counter-battery when such was necessary.

 

With these new assets in place, ATROM would shift its own focus from the trenches to the missile and MG emplacements that were unusually close to the trenches at the frontline, to the point they were even in direct line of sight. Naturally, missiles do not react well to being hit by 155 mm artillery shells and it was to be expected that these were cleared out rapidly.

 

Once it was deemed that the enemy defences and troops had been reduced enough, a armoured regiments would push forward. While the minefield prevented crossing, with 1.61 km depth, it was nowhere near enough to even prevent an autocannon from firing across. And with most of the defensive line by this point most likely at the verge of just disintegrating, this line-of-sight fire support was merely there to break whatever was left. DMT-85M1 armoured engineer vehicles with anti-mine ploughs would be brought to the frontlines, to clear the path for the Romanian units.

 

The hills flanking the plains were not taken on as brutally, however counter-battery efforts here would be conducted as well, including the launch of several more ALAS-B missiles to securely take out enemy artillery. Romanian commanders deemed it sufficient to just take the plan surrounding the hill and march on on Belgrade.

 

Golescu would write home this day "If this goes on like this, we'll wring their head like some damn chicken in no time."

 

Casualties on the Romanian side were rather light, mostly stemming from enemy artillery and mines.

 

[hr]

 

Confidential

 

As the Romanian soldiers in the Banat numbered some 440,000 at the start of operations, these would now be reinforced by 13 Motorised Infantry Divisions, 11 Mechanised Infantry Divisions, 4 Mountain Infantry Divisions and a further 4 Armoured Divisions, adding up to almost 290,000 added soldiers to join the front. These would be taken from the reserves, as well as units in Constantinopol and Ukraine. These units would be organised as the new III. Romanian Army. This would bring the overall number of fighting soldiers to over 700,000, which was deemed more than enough to take care of Yugoslavia.

Edited by Evangeline Anovilis
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At this point, the Belorussian units would arrive to the battle. There had been some changes in their numbers, and the Spetsnaz units that had been attached to them would not be entering Yugoslavia. This fight needed bodies, not finesse.

 

Belorussian Grad MRLs would join in with the Romanian rocket launchers in firing rockets containing smaller bomblets at the Yugoslav forces that left their trenches. Those that remained within their fortifications would not be any safer, and they would soon find themselves under attack by TOS-1A MRLs, which would fire rockets carrying fuel-air explosives at the Yugoslav fortifications. Belorussian self-propelled howitzers would also join the fight, firing precision rounds at the enemy fortifications, and engaging in counter-artillery operations against the Yugoslav artillery forces. Belorussian artillery forces would be moved about frequently, in order to avoid enemy fire.. Romanian armored forces advancing into Yugoslavia would be joined by Belorussian IFVs and MBTs, which, like the Romanian forces, would simply fire over the minefields. As far as air defenses went, Belorussian forces would deploy a handful of 9K22 Tunguska SAMs, in order to make sure that the Yugoslav air force kept its distance. Specially trained units would also be sent forward to get to work with clearing the mines.

Edited by Mr Director
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Alongside Amiral Marescu's fleet would be seven Prussian Ardeal-class vessels led by Konteradmiral Krüger. They would assist the Romanians in the completion of any of their objectives, and would fly only the insignia of the Hohenzollerns and Hohenzollern-Sigmaringens. The only way to tell them apart from the Romanian vessels would be visually, and they'd be well within the ships' armaments by that point.
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Confidential

 

A request would go out to Carthage, inquiring on whether it was possible for them to locate the fleet that had engaged in hostile action against Romania and forward any intelligence on it to Greater Romania. as someone had targetted Romanian satelites and the Carthaginean positioning in the Mediterranean was more than enough to keep track of such matters, it was hoped to make things easier this way.

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300,000 Hungarian soldiers would be sent to Yugoslavia's south to aid in it's defense, with the remaining 330,000 remaining in Hungary-Slovakia.

 

10  mobile SAMs, as well  as several dozen attack helicopters and a few hundred medium and main tanks would accompany them.

 

They would be stationed at several Yugoslavian air fields and between 4 or 5 different military bases in Yugoslavia's south, until they were further needed.

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Confidential

 

Given the quite substantial number of soldiers that was being mobilised and moved right past the Romanian Army, it was hard not to notice the Magyar intervention. The ambassador of the Greater Romanian Kingdom would duly submit to the Hungarian government a letter from the Romanian government.

 

"It has come to the attention of our forces, that the Magyar nation seemingly has seen it fit to send troops to Yugoslavia. We hereby request to be informed of their intention, as we would hope them not to fight Romanian soldiers. While Romania can understand to a degree Hungary's decision to stay out of such a war, we do however not in any way or form understand Hungary taking Yugoslavia's side. Should Hungary-Slovakia thus be found assisting Yugoslavia in its armed struggle, we cannot respond to such an act by any other means, than to recognise hostilities and to see your actions as an attack on Romania, with all consequences such an action would carry.

 

Signed,

Mihaela Constante"

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Reply to Bucharest

 

We have made it clear from the start that we are only getting involved defensively, and have personally assured Romania that we have no intention of aggression, hostility, or engaging in combat with Romania or any of it's military.  The only way we would do so is if Romania chose to engage our troops offensively first.

 

Furthermore, Hungary-Slovakia has done nothing hostile or aggressive towards Romania.  On the contrary, it has been Romania who has been acting aggressively towards Hungary-Slovakia, by engaging in gun-boat diplomacy, in clear violation of our pact."

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Confidential

 

For now, the III. Romanian Army, instead of being sent to the frontlines, would be delegated to the Ardeal, in preparation for Operation Hunedoara. The Magyar ambassador in Bucharest would be sent packing with a formal notice that Romania intented to immediatly terminate the alliance, with no prior notification, given Hungary had clearly violated intention and terms of the agreement. Likewise, the Romanian ambassador in Budapest would be withdrawn, given there was no real reason to conduct talks anymore.

 

Confidential Reply

 

Notification of Termination of the Treaty of Alliance between Hungary-Slovakia and Romania

 

While Hungary-Slovakia states it does not intent to actually engage Romanian soldiers, we would like to ask how it intents to defend Yugoslavia without doing so? Every three-year-old Romanian gypsie can figure as much out. as we see this war with yugoslavia as a preemptive action in response to Yugoslav preparations to destroy our country, should Hungary-Slovakia actually fight against our forces or those of our allies in this struggle, we will see this as a formal act of war. Romania hereby terminates the alliance, in the face of Hungarian violation of its terms and spirit and with it, any stationing agreement concerning the Magyar fleet.

 

Signed,

Mihaela Constante

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