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Cochin Space Research Organization


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The massive Yama-2 Heavy Lift rocket with the PS-2 shuttle piggybacked on it is awash from a sea of spot lights at the Launch Pad No.2 at the Space Launch Center, Karagandy. The crew of 10 were all strapped into their seats and Col. Vishwanathan, Mission Commander, is checking all the systems aboard the shuttle as 5 km away in the Mission Control Center, the countdown was ticking down.

As it reached zero ignition was sparked and the Yama-2 rocket with its 3 heavy boosters kicked into power propelling the PS-2 at great speed to the skies.

As the flight reached outer atmosphere most of the boosters were jettisoned and soon beyond NEO the PS-2 separated from the Yama-2.

The PS-2 was now independently powered.

Col. Vishwanathan was by now quite used to the forces and pressures of the space flight but the wonder was still with him. The weightlessness, the sight of earth's spherical curvature, it all still amazed him. This would be hie greatest achievement, he knew.

He was going to attain his most cherished childhood dream.

He was going to the moon.

Literally.

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The scintillating sight of the moon at such close quarters held the crew of PS-2 spell bound. In the 3 days of flight the PS-2 crew had traveled a total distance of 384,000 kms. Now they were about 254 kms from Lunar surface.

Col. Vishwanathan keyed in his microphone, "Mission Control, this is Flight Commander Vishwanathan. We are in Lunar Observation Altitude. Proceeding to Lunar Observation Orbit."

"We hear you, Colonel. Over."

The Colonel maneuvered the shuttle into the correct trajectory so that it would attain the preplanned orbit of 221 km above lunar surface. Through a number of time consuming maneuvers the space craft finally settled into its orbit.

Vishwanathan waited until the shuttle made 5 complete orbits around the moon before communicating with Mission Control in Earth.

"Mission Control, this is Flight Commander. We are in Lunar Observation Orbit. Successfully completed 5 revolutions around moon. All systems working perfectly. Direct contact established with Lunar Orbiter. Lunar Rover being contacted. Over."

During the flight in the crew had established communications with the Lunar Orbiter, the satellite that had been orbiting Moon for some years now which had provided all the data necessary for this mission. Now attempts were being made to establish contact with the Lunar Rover, the octopod robot that was launched on to Lunar Surface some years ago. The Rover had been conducting several time intensive experiments and surveying on the surface of the moon while transmitting the data to earth via the Lunar Orbiter and Cochin's own constellation of satellites in Geosynchronous and Sun Synchronous orbits.

"Commander, Rover signals are being received, look here," Dr. Priya, a Mission Control Engineer informed Col. Vishwanathan who looked at the frequency spectrum scanner which had finally tracked the specific signal being transmitted by the Rover. Soon the Rover's location was triangulated and preparations for final mission, begun.

"Mission Control, this is Flight Commander, Vishwanathan. Communication established with Lunar Rover. Proceeding with Lunar Landing Mission. Over."

"Best of luck, Commander. The whole of Kingdom is with you. Out" was the message squawking from the speakers.

"Okay, Ladies and Gentlemen. Let us get down to it. Lt. Col. Thomas, I am devolving PS-2 control over to you," Col. Vishwanathan said to his co- pilot, another officer from Royal Cochin Air Force. Vishwanathan and three other Mission Engineers now set out towards the aft of the space shuttle. First they entered the locker room where they changed into their extra vehicular activity suits. After donning their pressurized suits and associated life support systems, the four astronauts were transferred into the Air Lock Chamber through which they would transition towards the Work Station / Cargo hold of the shuttle. Since the canopy of the Cargo hold was now closed there is no need for tethering cables. They made their way towards the smaller vehicle held in the middle of the cargo hold.

The Lunar Landing Module is a 5mX5mX5m octagonal module with attached support limbs and shock absorpant padding. The LLM has thrust engines underneath its body and directional vector thrusters on its limbs. When all four astronauts had strapped into the LLM and their life support systems connected to the reserve pressurized air tanks in the module, Col. Vishwanathan signaled for the Cargo Hold hatch to be opened.

As the cavernous hatch opened revealing the moon at a massively magnified scale, the mechanical tethers holding the LLM were released and a few spurts from the limb thrusters separated it from the Space Shuttle.

The mission to land on moon was on its way.

The engines of the module could not be abused with unnecessary powering. Its main purpose was to achieve lift off from the surface of the moon to get back to the Space Shuttle.

Slowly Col. Vishwanathan achieved the entry into Moon's terminal gravitational field. Brief spurts of concerted thrusts from the main engines and various limb thrusters ensured that the LLM was falling down at a manageable speed and in the correct orientation.

Cameras on the sides of the module kept recording various imagery of the flight and other instruments studied various aspects of the Lunar medium through which the vehicle was traveling.

Finally at an altitude of a few meters Col. Vishwanathan produced a one second burst at quarter power setting from the main engines which slowed down the module for a sufficiently soft lunar landing.

The 8 extended limbs of the Lunar Landing Module had superbly absorbed the shock of landing. With breathless voice, Col. Vishwanathan keyed his communications pod and said,

"Pushpak-2, Mission Control Center, Karagandy, Kingdom of Cochin and the world. This is Mission Flight Commander, Colonel Vishwanathan. We have landed on the moon."

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Col. Vishwanathan powered down the thrusters and unstrapped himself from the command chair. His three crew members were also getting ready. Vishwanathan now slowly opened the hatch and gained the first sight of lunar terrain.

With bated breath Vishwanathan jumped on to the soil and bounced back like a bunny in the low gravity!

It has finally come true. He has finally reached the moon! His childhood dream had been fulfilled.

The first act was to plant the flag of Cochin on the surface of the moon. Though Cochin had made its first imprint through the less publicized Lunar Rover Mission, this would properly stake Cochin's claim as Explorers of the Moon.

Col. Vishwanathan planted the flag while two of his crew members took photos and videos of the event.

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Meanwhile the Lunar Rover had come near their landing site thus fulfilling its long mission. It would now return to earth with its precious cargo of soil samples taken over the long duration of its explorations on moon. The Rover would now be replaced by the Lunar Exploratory Craft, a more advanced and larger rover from CSRO. The crew members placed some sounding instruments on the moon and affixed a metal plate bearing the flag, location and information about the Kingdom of Cochin on a rock.

They then settled down to conduct their various experiments.

They would stay on the moon for a total of 8 hours.

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OOC: May not be the place but I have a space related question. I am allowed to RP sending a satellite out and sending missions to the moon because that was done in 1969 and My tech level is up to 1980s?

OOC: you need Satellite improvements in game to get Satallites here, and you need a Space Program IG to get to the moon. And before you say "Thats not how it works", that actually is how it works. Without a space program in place, no one would of gotten to the moon in 1969.

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The Malvinas, although firm friend of the Kingdom of Cochin, we question the validity of these claims, why is the flag fluttering?

the shadows are wrong in both images.

Shadows on the Moon are complicated by uneven ground, wide angle lens distortion, light reflected from the Earth, and lunar dust. Shadows also display the properties of vanishing point perspective leading them to converge to a point on the horizon.

In pure vacuum conditions, after the manipulation (of handling the flag) stopped, the momentum caused the flag to flap wildly as if it were being blown by a breeze. This is because there was no resistance from air to dampen the motion. In a vacuum, a flag does not need wind to flap for a while after a person sets it in motion.

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After around 8 hours of activity on the Moon the 4 astronauts started to get ready for the return flight to the Space Shuttle. The Rover 1 was strapped into its bay and the second rover was deployed on to the Moon. It would now function on the moon for another 5 years when its estimated half life would be up and be then subjected to replacement. Various ground samples were taken, also several astronomical instruments were fixed on to the moon. Finally with the crew all ready Col. Vishwanathan powered on the engines. The engines came to life propelling the Lunar Landing Module up to space. The lower gravity and lower atmospheric drag caused the ascent to be obtained through far lesser power than would have been ever possible in Earth.

As the LLM gradually sped away from the Moon the PS-2 was maneuvering itself to recapture the LLM. Beacons on the LLM informed the crew on shuttle as to the exact location and trajectory taken by it. Lt. Col. Thomas, now the flight commander of PS-2, was holding the spacecraft on to a very narrow course for optimum recapture of the LLM.

Col. Vishwanathan also received the course track as predicted by the computers aboard PS-2 and then transmitted to the LLM. Deftly guiding the module with a concerted series of thrusts from the main engine and each individual limb thrusters the LLM slowly made its way towards the shuttle.

After a two hour long acrobatics finally the LLM was flying top side towards the moon and bottom side towards the open cargo bay of the Space Shuttle which itself was flying top side towards moon. With short deft thrusts the Col. Vishwanathan managed to center the module to land in its correct position. A set of laser ranging devices placed on the cargo bay floor also enabled Vishwanathan to make some final adjustments. Finally with a dull thud the Module landed on the reinforced cargo deck of the PS-2. Before the module could bounce back, the mechanical clamps became shut thus attaching the module firmly to the shuttle. The Lunar crew members started strapping off their seats and powering down the various systems while the cargo bay doors closed above them. Once cargo bay doors were shut the 4 crew members came out of the module and made their way towards the Air Lock Chamber. As the Air Lock Chamber repressurized with breathing air the crew members took off their helmets and cheered!

They had made it to moon and back.

Now to return to earth and share this joy with the rest of their countrymen.

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CSRO Press Briefing

Cochin Space Research Organization announces the completion and commissioning of the new Satellite Launching Center at Dagring in Tibet Province. SLC Dagring has been designed on similar scale as the SLC Karagandy and would be used for shuttle related missions. The Ministry of Transportation has laid out a dedicated railway line to transport the various materials for the satellite launches. A CSRO customized heavy lift Halob would be permanently stationed here for Shuttle Transportation. A squadron of RCAF transport aircrafts would also be based here for CSRO purposes.

SLC Dagring has 4 launch pads, 2 Mission Control Centers, 6 Mission Assembly Hangars and 10 Vehicle Storage Hangars. SLC Dagring would soon see its first launch, the launch of the Destiny module which would be done by a YAMA-2 Heavy Lift Rocket and would be connected with Trisanku by the crew of PS-2 returning from Moon.

CSRO also announced the imminent first flight of the third space shuttle of the Pushpak fleet which would be based at the SLC Serca.

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The YAMA-2 lifted off from SLC Dagring amidst a thunder of applause as the various scientists and engineers who had built this facility saw the validation of their hard work.

The Yama-2 Heavy Lift rocket used for this mission had 4 extra boosters to carry the heavy Destiny module. Destiny would be one of the principal modules where the astronauts would conduct experiments. Once sent on to its trajectory the Destiny would then be towed to the Trisanku and connected to it by the crew from PS-2.

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xx Classified xx

SST may send its batch of astronauts to Cochin. They would be given the necessary training and be take as part of the next Shuttle Mission.

**CLASSIFIED**

May some Michuraza Astronauts come also, Michuraza wants to have one of our people in space also it would be a great honor to us becuase it would be the first that any Michurazen would be able to go in space.

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XX Classified XX

Of course, Cochin is planning many shuttle missions and some Michurazan astronauts could definitely participate in some of them. You would have to send your candidates to Cochin for the requisite flight and mission training.

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The crew of the PS-2 were weary with exhaustion after their extended tour however there was also a sense of excitement at their historic achievement. Now they had one last duty to perform before returning to Earth.

The Destiny module was orbiting at some distance from the Trisanku's location. The first job of PS-2 was to position itself at a suitable distance from the module. 3 of the crew members now donned their EVA suits and were led out of the shuttle via an Air Lock. Attached to the shuttle with harness cables and carrying towing gear they moved towards the module using the jet thrusters on their suits. Reaching the module the 3 astronauts attached the grappeling gear at the appropriate positions and thus secured the module to the space craft. Then they returned to the Shuttle via the Air Lock through which they had exited.

Col. Vishwanathan slowly flew the shuttle towards the location of the Trisanku taking care that the towing of the immensely heavy module does not damage the space craft. After about 3 hours of intrepid flying finally the module was close to the Space Station.

The 3 astronauts once again exited from the Pushpak and disconnected the cables from the module and maneuvered the module to its appropriate dock in Node1.

After a further 2 hours of work the Destiny module was attached to Trisanku and the astronauts returned to their space shuttle. Now they could all return home.

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Col. Vishwanathan was quite tired after the many days in zero gravity environment and the extended mission. While the Destiny module was being attached by his crew members Vishwanathan was taking a short nap while Lt. Col. Thomas was at the controls. Now that the crew had returned and it was time for reentry Col. Vishwanathan was back at the controls.

The Pushpak shuttle slowly underwent pancaking as it reentered earth's atmosphere at a very obtuse angle, barely 5 degrees inclination. The heat of reentry heated up the ceramic insulators all over the shuttle, especially at its bottom and wings. The shuttle was entering over Antarctica and is now over Indian Ocean when it undertakes a series of S turns to reduce its air speed to a more manageable one. As the shuttle finally entered Cochin airspace Col. Vishwanathan powered its terrestrial thrust motors, two heavy duty jet engines that would assist the Pushpak in attaining powered flight for landing.

The descent was programmed so that it would reach proper altitude for landing procedure at the SLC Karagandy. Leveling his sight on the 15km long Ultra Heavy Duty runway at SLC Karagandy Col. Vishwanathan lowered the landing wheels and prepared the braking parachutes for deployment. Under the gentle ministrations of the veteran aviator the graceful space craft touched the tarmac in a nose up fashion. At the very moment that the nose wheels also touched the ground, Lt. Col. Thomas deployed the parachute brakes releasing 5 massive Vectran parachutes attached via high tensile fibers to the fuselage of the space craft. Water sprinklers on either sides of the tarmac for about 2 miles released a stream of water that absorbed the heat from the high durability tires heated by the high speed landing.

Finally after a long landing roll, the Pushpak Space Shuttle came to rest. A Tatra tow truck then approached the shuttle to tow it towards the main facility. By this time Col. Vishwanathan and his crew had powered down the engines and all non essential equipments and systems and were retrieving their personal materials from the crew locker room.

As the space craft finally rolled to a stop Col. Vishwanathan yanked open the Direct Air Lock Chamber. Breathing his first breath of fresh air in many days Col. Vishwanathan blinked into a blue sky speckled with a few randomly shaped white clouds.

The explosion of sound shocked him for a moment causing him to jerk backwards, however he recovered when he realized that it was the sound of applause and cheering from a huge mass of humanity waiting for them a few hundred meters away.

Hundreds of people were waving and cheering for them - literally the whole strength of CSRO is here!

A truck then came up to them with an attached ladder by which the crew slowly clambered down on jittery legs slowly accustoming to gravity. As they reached the ground two vehicles drove up to them, a Jeep and a Bus. From the Jeep a couple of people dressed in sterilized suits came up to them.

They knew that it was nothing strange, they always were thoroughly disinfected before let loose among people after space travel.

The two people walked towards them and one of them extended his hands to Col. Vishwanathan. After shaking hands with him, the man addressed them all.

"Congratulations Ladies and Gentlemen, you have indeed brought great honor and prestige to the Kingdom. I salute you."

It was then that the slack jawed crew of the mission realized who the person was addressing them. They had heard his voice and seen his voice many times but always through an electronic interface.

The King of Cochin himself.

The crew as one saluted their monarch.

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Second Mission to Moon

The Cochin Space Research Organization announces a second mission to moon aboard the new PS-3 Pushpak Space Shuttle. This mission would have a larger complement of mission specialists and would we conducting several missions on lunar surface. This mission would also test the scaled prototype of Antrix Space Vehicle would be transported as a module in the PS-3. The Antrix would be used for the actual lunar landing in the place of the Lunar Landing Module used in the earlier Moon Mission.

Several experiments have been conceptualized for this mission, like Charged Particle Lunar Environment Experiment, Lunar Atmosphere Composition Experiment, Lunar Ejecta and Meteorites Experiment and Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment.

The Palace has announced that astronauts from other nations are also welcome to join this endeavor. Currently a mission complement of 4 Shuttle Crew and 15 Mission Specialists have been designed for this mission of which 5 mission specialists slot would be kept open for astronauts from friendly nations to fill up.

Any nation hoping to join this Mission is invited to contact the CSRO with the name and technical expertise of the Astronaut volunteering.

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***Private Query from Promised Land***

We have no less than four astronauts willing to go into space on this mission. We realize that probably not all of them will be brought, but all have volunteered.

Their qualifications are in an attatchment to this message

***End Merssage***

Attached to the message was a brief summary of the best training that could be provided. All the individuals had been in zero gravity before, but only in orbit around the planet, and none of them for a period longer than three days.

One was a geologist, who could provide analysis of any moon rock samples. Another was a brilliant engineer and technician.

A third showed an uncanny ability to predict solar activity. He wasn't right all the time, but he could predict with large success any flares that could fatally interfere with the mission. Another was qualified to fly just about anything that could fly...in other words, a brilliant pilot.

While the call was for mission specialists, one could never be too careful in how much backup you had.

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xx Private to Promised Land xx

We thank you for the interest shown. If no other nation wishes to join our mission we would be happy to accept all your four astronauts. However in the event that only one of these four are able to go, we would prefer the geologist to come with us. Avionics, engineering and events such as solar flares are already assigned to the Shuttle crew. The mission specialists would have no role in the mission to moon itself, only on the moon.

Thank You,

Vignesh Sarabhai,

Director,

Cochin Space Research Organization.

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xx Private to Promised Land xx

"You can send him as soon as possible. The astronaut could be sent to the Cochin International Airport from where he/she would be taken to the Air Warfare Center, Pavlodar for medical examination and subsequently to CSRO facilities in Karagandy for mission specific training.

Sd,

Vignesh Sarabhai,

Director,

CSRO.

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xx Private to Promised Land xx

"You can send him as soon as possible. The astronaut could be sent to the Cochin International Airport from where he/she would be taken to the Air Warfare Center, Pavlodar for medical examination and subsequently to CSRO facilities in Karagandy for mission specific training.

Sd,

Vignesh Sarabhai,

Director,

CSRO.

"In that case, he will be on the next flight out."

The astronaut was sent via commercial flight to save money. Any items deemed necessary for him to take for the mission, but might not be allowed through airport security, would be sent later.

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The Promised Land astronaut would be met at the airport by a CSRO official and would then be led to a commercial flight to Pavlodar where they would go to Air Warfare Academy for flight and medical examinations. Here the astronaut would be tested for G forces and a full spectrum medical analysis would be conducted on him. After a week of examinations the astronaut would be taken to Karagandy where CSRO's main facilities are located. Here he would be introduced to the other members of the mission, ie Cochin nationals, who have the jobs of Shuttle Crew and Mission Specialists. The astronaut would be introduced to the various instrument packages being taken to the moon and asked about the experiments he would be conducting and handling requirements of his equipments.

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The astronaut, whose name was Sean Crocket, would pass their mediacl tests with, if not flying colors, close to it. He was physically fit.

When he met his fellow crew-members, he was not afraid to introduce himself. He was a likeable, outgoing enough fellow, who nevertheless was capable of focusing on the job at hand if needed.

He intended, of course, to take samples from various areas around the landing site of the mission. What experiments could be performed in the zero-atmosphere environment of the moon would be done, and explained that the necessary equipment for these experiments would be supplied by his own government, if it hadn't come with him already in his luggage.

He assured those he talked to that nothing would be over the weight limit.

OOC: Don't have a big knowledge of what would be done, so I'm leaving the details hazy. he's obviously not bringing any heavy equipment with him.

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