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The Greater Indonesian Archipelago


Subtleknifewielder
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November 2009: The economy of Indonesia receives a substantial boost when new sources of crude oil are discovered, along with natural gas pockets. Prospectors strike it rich with several well-sized gold deposits. President Susilio Bambang Yudhoyono is assassinated by a bomb that leaves himself and 11 others dead, with 13 more sent to the hospital in critical condition.4 of the dead and seven of the wounded are children. After a short investigation, a newly formed group of Islamic fundamentalists claims responsibility, and says they will not stop until all heathens in Indonesia convert, are killed, or leave. In Papua New Guinea, the economy stalls, prompting protests. So far they remain peaceful.

December 2009: Vice-President Jusuf Kalla is sworn in by the People’s Consultive Assembly (MPR), or the legislature. In his inauguration speech, he declares that “the government will not rest until those responsible for this vile attack are brought to justice.” Another attack, this time a sniper attempt, narrowly misses him as he leaves the podium. Crackdowns on suspected militants are begun in Jakarta.

January-March 2010: Crackdowns in Jakarta continue, and are initiated in other major population centers across the nation even as attack attempts grow more frequent. Not all the attacks are claimed by the fundamentalists…particularly the assassinations of several legislators who have in the past faced charges of corruption. However, attacks perpetrated by the group are more and more frequently intercepted by security forces, due in no small part to a series of helpful anonymous tips. The worsening economy of Papua New Guinea begins to prompt riots.

April 2010: When a series of concerned citizens reports hearing shots fired in a currently unoccupied building, police find the leader of the group dead, along with the bodies of several of his lieutenants, in what appears to be an internal disagreement gone bad. Several members of the legislature disappear without a trace. The riots in Papua New Guinea explode into full rebellion, prompting movement of Indonesian military forces to the border.

May-June 2010: Both Papua New Guinea’s Prime Minister and Governor-General die in the violence of the revolt. Isolated islands are largely immune from the violence. More Indonesian troops and armor are deployed to the border. Members of the Indonesian government continue to disappear, and each time, documents detailing their corruption are found soon after. Several resign, amidst rumors that they too are connected with the corruption.

July 2010: President Kalla declares martial law, and the legislature is disbanded. The Spreme Court upholds his decision. Despite the political turmoil, Indonesia’s economy continues to grow at a phenomenal rate. What is left of Papua New Guinea’s government and military ask Indonesia for help. Malaysia attempts to take advantage of the political turmoil by fully taking control of the Strait of Malacca, an important trade route even in the world’s current unstable state. Kalla warns that this turmoil is not to be taken as a sign of weakness.

August 2010: The pacification of Papua New Guinea’s holdings on the main island proceeds better than expected, with fully half under control within three weeks. Malaysia stalls negotiations in an attempt to buy time to fully consolidate their control of the strait. President Kalla, seeing through the ruse, accelerates military expansion, begun when Papua New Guinea fell. Previously inactive troops are deployed to the land border on Borneo.

September-December 2010: Control and pacification of the island of New Guinea is completed. In a lightning strike, a barrage of missiles and aircraft decimate the Malaysian fleet that attempts to control the strait, and troops move across the land border supported by armor and air. Naval forces continually bombard land positions to soften them up for eventual offensives. In the end, Malaysia is driven completely from Borneo, and the maritime border in the Strait of Malacca returns to its pre-war position. In the fighting, both nations’ air forces are severely depleted, the Indonesian navy cut in half, and the Malaysian navy almost completely destroyed.

January 2011-Present: During its consolidation period, the nation and its newly-acquired territories enter a period of semi-isolation. Borders are closed, with foreigners permitted only through major trade routes, and none are permitted to land. Trade, however, does continue through official government-sanctioned traders and ships allowed to dock in foreign ports.

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India recognizes the Greater Indonesian Archipelago. As fellow Indian Ocean residents we seek to improve trade relations between our two nations.

"Trade will be permitted, with the understanding it has to take place in your territory--landfall by outsiders is not currently allowed."

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"Trade will be permitted, with the understanding it has to take place in your territory--landfall by outsiders is not currently allowed."

Perhaps Indonesia would choose to make that statement more clear? Will Indonesian markets be opened for Indian products as Indian markets would be opened up in a trade agreement?

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Perhaps Indonesia would choose to make that statement more clear? Will Indonesian markets be opened for Indian products as Indian markets would be opened up in a trade agreement?

Our exports will still be made available to you, and we will still trade for products, but not in our ports. No Non-Indonesian is currently permitted to step foot on our soil.

We realize it may cost a little more to have all trading occur in your lands, but rest assured, we are willing to pay for the extra costs ourselves.

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Our exports will still be made available to you, and we will still trade for products, but not in our ports. No Non-Indonesian is currently permitted to step foot on our soil.

We realize it may cost a little more to have all trading occur in your lands, but rest assured, we are willing to pay for the extra costs ourselves.

This situation does not sound promising to India so we are afraid India must withdraw its offer for the time being. With no access to your markets it would merely be a one way street. Perhaps we can try to reinstate the deal at a later date.

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"We are sorry to hear that. May we ask what in particular is wrong with the offer? you would still have full access to all our exports, and we would be paying more for yours."

"If we were to have mutual trade our products would have as much access to your markets as your products would have in ours. In a situation where our industries and businesses are not permitted to operate in your nation it is difficult to see how much access we would have indeed to your markets. We reiterate our hopes that we may start proper trade at a more liberal time."

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"We cannot, of course, force you to trade with us. We do note that our waters are still open to the passage of your ships."

"That is one concession that we much appreciate. We thank Indonesia for its cooperation."

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