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Japanese Expeditions


Mergerberger II
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In the Land of the Rising Sun, where peace had reigned supreme for some seventy years, and the people's will had been done, and more advancements had been made here than surely any other nation in what was the Japanese world, the Emperor decided upon something glorious, exploration. He commissioned five ships of a brand new design, 帆前船, the Homaesen, to set out across the endless ocean, for no reason other than to see what was out there, what lay beyond the horizon. Curiosity about the unknown that surrounded them engulfed the Japanese people, driving them to pursue every bit of news about these sailors, these men so brave to go into the dark unknown, out into rough seas, to see what was out there, for no other reason than to know and to say....

The Japanese Emperor commissioned 5 ships, the Hakudo Maru, the leader of the group, named for the mythical being that came down from the heavens and enriched us with the knowledge of shipbuilding; the Hiryū, the Flying Dragon; the Honshu, for the largest and most glorious of all the Japanese islands; the Heian, for the glorious city of Japan; the Yamato, for the first true empire of Japan; and the Nihon, the Rising Sun. These ships sailed south, near the Chinese coast, around Siam, exploring the ports there, and heading towards India, where they would stop, in a month after their original departure, and find some of the most glorious things they had ever seen. From there, with their cargoes rather heavy with goods, they continued to Arabia, to Oman and the Caliphate, finding yet more interesting and foreign cultures.

However, he also commissioned 3 more sets to sail on less glorious voyages. One group went in each direction, the group headed by the Hakudo Maru went Westward, another southward, another eastward, and another Northward. They were all destined to bring back news of the most amazing images and peoples, and yet they also observed the weaknesses, and told of who should be conquered and who should be our allies, and who should we exploit and who should we destroy.

The Northward Journey was relatively boring, finding only ice and Aleutian Natives, a people that really did not interest the Japanese, though of all those foreigners found, these were definitely the most logical and kindest peoples that they had met. No dispatch was sent Northward once the ships returned home, instead those that had sailed north were placed on secondary missions to the more interesting directions.

The Southward Journey found many, many native Asian peoples, most not unified, not like the Aleutians, and most very weak. Filipinos, Malays, Aborigines, and Pacific Islanders were among the people found. The ships found dense jungles, thick forests, and immense mountains. They found water so blue it could not be believed, and people with far darker skin than they. The Japanese were intrigued, and yet the natives in Hitou (Philippines) were very willing to give them their goods and teach them their ways, and these were people not even a fortnight's journey from southern Japan. They could be easily reached, and it surprised the Emperor that they had not been discovered before. A substance that had made its presence on the Japanese stage known only a short time before arrived from the Malay peoples, Gold. Kin. This would make the Empire rich, as Gold had been established as currency already. And the Malays had no value of gold, they simply thought the metal particularly shiny, and thus thought it a good gift to give the foreigners.

The Westward Journey was one wrought with hardship and mutiny. The Journey was so very long that by the time it had actually reached the Americas, a mere two ships remained and there was exactly 0 food remaining in the cargo holds, as there had been for nearly a fortnight. The natives, fortunately, were happy to trade with the Japanese, offering them enough food to fill their stores and make the journey back to Japan. The shipmen arrived home with word of vast plains and great sand deserts, grand mountains, and huge forests. Golden sands and news of the heat are what they returned with, having discovered the west coast of North America.

The Emperor considered his options, and as there was more to be gained from the East and the South, he devoted many resources to those directions. He still sent ships to the West, some containing settlers, who in theory would establish the first Japanese colony in the Americas, far north of where the original settlers had found themselves, in the area today known as Vancouver. They adored the Pacific Northwest, it reminded them of home. He also brought trade relations to the Hawaiian people, whose pineapple was a most desirable dish for the Japanese at home. More and more Japanese ships would begin to trade with Hawaii, bringing the peoples closer and closer together, and making Japan greedier and greedier.

To the East the Emperor sent a massive fleet. Nearly 100 trading vessels set out to India, the Caliphate, and another 25 were sent around the "Horn of Africa", albeit mistakenly, they had been run off course, however they encountered smooth sailing on the West Coast of Africa, traveling all the way North into what was known to the locals as "Europe". The men encountered civilization for the first time in nearly six months, and it was a great relief to finally, at long last, be off their boats.

To the Kingdom of Cochin

From His Majesty the Emperor of Japan,

Sir, my sailors set out nearly three years ago for distant lands about which we had only heard rumors and stories passed down from travelers to our grandparents. But lo, these lands exist, lands flowing with the fruit of the world, and some of the greatest goods known to any man in this enormous Earth.

I have a desire to begin a trade relationship, and am thus requesting your permission to continue to send Caravels and other Japanese ships to your ports to enrich our nation with your spices, sweets, and exotic teas, and in exchange we can offer you a number of things from technology advancements to money to rice. I do hope you will consider my offer.

To The Caliphate

From His Majesty the Emperor of Japan,

Your Majesty, shipmen from Japan set out nearly three years ago, as I am sure you are aware, with the intent of discovering new lands about which we had heard only rumors and stories from our grandparents, and behold, they do exist, these lands flowing with milk and honey and glory.

I and my people have a desire to engage in a trade relationship with The Caliphate, and thus I am requesting your formal permission to send Japanese Caravels and other trading ships to The Caliphate to obtain the goods desired by the Japanese people in exchange for anything that the Caliphate desires, please do simply name your wish and we will grant it.

To The Kingdom of Spain, Portugal, and Italy

From His Majesty the Emperor of Japan,

Sir, my sailors set out nearly three years ago for distant lands about which we had only heard rumors and stories passed down from travelers to our grandparents. But lo, these lands exist, lands flowing with the fruit of the world, and some of the greatest goods known to any man in this enormous Earth.

I have a desire to begin a trade relationship, and am thus requesting your permission to continue to send Caravels and other Japanese ships to your ports to enrich our nation with your goods, and all that your nation has to offer, in exchange for what our nation has to offer. We come from two far different cultures, yet we are all men, and we all seek fame and fortune, and with trade between our nations, and goods so exotic, we become far wealthier than we ever have dreamed in the past.

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