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Peter Ilyich
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To: President Ashton Coolidge, United States of America

From: President Milton Luke(OOC: Changing his name :P), Confederate States of America

 

Dear President Coolidge,

 

First, I would like to congratulate you on your presidency and the reformation of the United States of America. As the Confederacy had stated to you before, we would like to invite you to Montgomery, Alabama, the Capital of the States, to discuss many issues including the security of both our nations, our futures, and possibly the most pressing issue at hand: land.

 

Please do not misunderstand the States when we say we are interested in some of the southern land of yourselves. The nation believes that South Carolina, being the first state to secede in 1861 and practically starting the war, should be occupied by their Confederacy. At that point, it would only make since that Georgia be granted Confederate statehood.

 

Please, although this seems unacceptable or like a levity, we do not threaten you with any military force and much less plan to force you to commit such an action. I hope you will simply take the time to meet with us and do some traditional and worthwhile negotiation, to see what we two can work out.

 

See, the Union and the Confederacy can work together, if only we tried.

 

With Best Regards,

 

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Milton Luke

President of the Confederate States of America

February 22, 1862; Deo Vindice

Edited by Peter Ilyich
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It would be relayed to the Confederate President that the American President was dealing with many domestic issues and would not be able to make it to Montgomery. Vice President Anderson would take Air Force Two to the CSA to represent the White House if the Confederates would accept him as a representative. 

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"The Confederacy would prefer if someone who is not a Georgian Unionist, as we believe his opinion on the matter could be biased. We do hope you understand our thought process on this matter. If he is the most and only worthwhile representative, however, we suppose he may come as your representative."

Edited by Peter Ilyich
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To President Milton Luke of The Confederate States of America

From The Office of The President of The United States of America

 

Mister President,

 

I put my full faith and credit in Vice President Anderson who has served two terms as Governor of Georgia, a representative to the Continental Congress, served the people as Mayor of the City of Savannah, and has two degrees from Georgetown University in Political Science and Law. Diminishing this man just because he is from the State of Georgia and believes in his country is a very questionable action indeed. I respectfully state that you are to either accept the Vice President as a diplomat from the United States, or you are to be satisfied without a diplomat. 

 

Regards,

 

200px-Seal_of_the_President_of_the_Unite

 

Ashton Coolidge

President of The United States of America

 

 

---

 

 

Again, assuming that the Vice President would be welcomed he would go to the meeting place in the Confederacy after flying there on Air Force Two.

Edited by PresidentDavid
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The vehicle began to drive. The president's limousine was extremely quiet and comfortable, and he was prepared to begin. "While we drive, I think we should first address the scenario that one of us is faced with a war. The dilemma is whether or not we two should consider signing a treaty obligating us to defend the other. Would you be interested in such a treaty?"

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Mark was a bit taken aback by the President's proposition. He continued to let the foreign leader continue while he pondered what his response would be. "Well Mister President," he said in a southern drawl. "I have to say I wasn't expecting such a proposition from you, especially before we even got to your capital. I'll have to respectfully decline your offer for a number of reasons; primarily because the President didn't authorize me to negotiate such a treaty and also the American government knows little to nothing about your domestic affairs, foreign policy, and a number of other opinions and regulations that we will need to research before such an agreement could be reached. I can't imagine the United States of America defending a nation who she knows nothing of. Though,  I am curious as to why the Confederacy requested an American diplomat? The President briefed me that it had to do with borders between the United States and the Confederate States, but from what I understand the borders of our States are quite clear, don't you think?"

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Yes, they are clear and quite fair. The Confederacy, as it was historically started in 1861, and formed in 1862, was mainly started by one state: South Carolina. Now, we  in no means are requesting all former Confederate states under your administration, we simply believe that the state that practically started the Confederacy might be better suited as Confederate. Unfortunately, that would also likely mean our occupation of Georgia. We have no reason to take it by force, nor any intentions, however I hope you at least consider this, and we can definitely discuss it more. Following this, we have no intention to claim any former United States land."

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"I'm sorry Mister President, but I cannot oblige you when it comes to ceding States in the Union to the Confederacy. Especially when the only justification is that several hundred years ago the Confederacy occupied those States. I'll remind you that for hundreds of years before that, and after the war, those States were part of the Union and happily remained so. As just having left the office of Governor of Georgia, I can personally tell you that Georgia leaving the Union is not a very popular option and I assume it's the same for South Carolina, which I remind you is now one State with North Carolina simply called 'Carolina'. But even if we wanted to hand over Georgia and south Carolina to the Confederacy, I'm afraid it would be an unconstitutional act that we simply wouldn't get away with. Just as no State has the right to leave the Union, the Union does not have the right to cede any State."

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"I was not aware it was set in your constitution." he said. "Well, we Confederates respect our constitution, so I suppose we understand. However, that means we can not make any promises of not expanding into any other lands formerly United States. All due respect, and I understand it is likely it is not our business, but it saddens me that your nation now prohibits a right given to the people a far back as 1776, and the one that gave the Confederacy life. "

Edited by Peter Ilyich
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"That was not a new right given to the people in 1776, because that right had existed for all of human history, it was simply put into practice. James Madison, who is the father of my Constitution, made an interesting statement. He said that the argument of secession is usually a clouded one because we aren't looking at the full picture. Truly, there are two types of secession. The first is to secede for any reason no matter how, just or unjust, logical or illogical, the reason may be. The second is to secede from 'intolerable oppression'. The first type of secession goes against the very idea of having a United States of America and also retracts the allegiance and faith that our forefathers declared and our ancestors confirmed. The second type of secession is just another word for Revolution. Revolution is a right we all share regardless of what anyone says. Blind secession based on emotion, fear, and ultimately to defend the buying and selling of other people is unequivocally and rightfully unconstitutional. Revolution from an oppressive government that does not protect the rights of its citizens and even goes as far as to infringe on them is an American value. I'm sorry Mister President, but the fear of the number of Free States outnumbering the number of Slave States in the Senate is not a justifiable reason for secession, and was thus unconstitutional. 

 

"That being said, the Confederate States of America I am in right now did not secede from the United States. It came together and formed independently and, as far as I know, without the legalization of slavery or indentured servitude. I'm happy to be here and talk with you about strengthening our relationship and keeping our countries safe, but I, nor the President, nor the Congress, nor the States will either consider or debate ceding any State to a foreign government, Mister President. I hope this wont be something that continues to divide us."

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