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The United States of America


PresidentDavid
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maine01.jpg

 

The snow outside was nearly coming down in layers. Light from the sun had trouble coming down to the Earth through the thick snow clouds that crowded the sky. The virgin forests of Maine were now not only thick with vegetation and towering timber but also feet of packed snow. Thirty-five year old Ashton Coolidge enjoyed every brittle crunch each time he took a step through the beautiful wilderness. "Sir, is it much further than this? We've been walking for miles." Ashton's assistant Dug panted almost sickly as they tracked through the snow while Ashton marched on like a trooper. To Dug's relief he pointed and said, "See that clearing right there? The coast is just about on the other side of that hill. Once we get to the boat I'll do the work." Dug kept quiet and trotted through the snow and over the hill.

 

Ashton wasn't lying, the coast was only about one-hundred yards away. A small wooden dock extended out into the mix of ice and numbingly-cold water. Attached to the dock was a small sailboat which was built to accommodate three people at most. Luckily the ice hadn't froze enough of the shore to incase Ashton's boat as well. Dug followed his boss and smiled at the site of the rest. Ashton stepped in first and offered Dug a seat. Using a small motor, they drifted out about ten yards into the Atlantic where the wind was increasingly barraging the two men. Ashton pulled up the sail and pointed at a small pole that was erect from the back of the boat, "Hoist the flag dug. Wouldn't want to confuse anyone." Dug raised the blue flag of Maine which quickly began to flutter.

 

The goal was to finish a few nautical miles north of their location, but of course nothing ever goes to plan. When in the world of politics, these alterations of plans become much larger and have greater meaning. It was of great interest to Ashton and Dug when a small National Guard gunship flying the flag of Maine approached the sailboat and hailed them both. Ashton pulled down the sail and lowered the anchor. "Governor? Do I have permission to board your vessel?" Ashton offered his hand to help the soldier on board. The man thankfully took it and then helped a second man who wasn't in uniform. "Governor Coolidge, this is Matthew Smith." Ashton shook the man's hand and looked at the parchment he was holding. "Governor, I am an official courier of the First Congress of The United States of America in Washington D.C. They have confirmed that a President and Vice President of The United States of America have been elected by the electoral college. I am one of the thirteen messengers sent to the governors to inform what the results are." Matthew broke the red seal on the parchment. "Vice President: Governor Mark Anderson of the State of Georgia. President: Governor Ashton Coolidge of the State of Maine." 

 

 

 

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24 Hours Later

Washington D.C.
The White House

 

Ashton folded his hands and looked into the camera before him quite carefully. While there was not much senior staff in his administration yet he knew without doubt that an address to the nation and the world needed to be made. One of the world's superpowers, the American Commonwealth, had been overthrown by an Asian nation in a rather surprising attack. It was indeed a fearful time for the entire hemisphere, but especially the fifty States and Canadian provinces that make up North America. CNN, NBC, FOX News, and ABC were all set to a direct feed from the White House. It would be the most watched televised speech in American history. For those few minutes, more than 200,000,000 Americans were watching throughout the continent - though the United States of America only spanned the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York (including Vermont), Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Virginia (including West Virginia), Carolina (including both Carolinas), and Georgia.

 

"Good evening my fellow Americans. The first address a leader usually makes comes with well-thought out plans for the term of the leader and how he intends to make his country a better place. I do not have such a luxury because I am overseeing the establishment of a new government after the fall of one ridden with aspects of oligarchy and a false identity. The American Commonwealth, a nation under the flag of one State and under a disturbingly altered version of the constitution, has been overthrown by the Japanese government and formally abolished by the First Congress of the United States. I am grateful to the Japanese who have risked their lives in order to defend our right to the pursuit of happiness but who are more importantly not enforcing their dogma on this new government.

 

After only one month of liberation from the American Commonwealth, these thirteen States have sent representatives and formed a new united government that intends to defend the rights of its citizens, keep peace in this hemisphere, and promote global prosperity whenever possible. There is much work that needs to be done in these coming months. So much that I cannot give you a specific outline at this time, but once my cabinet has been established and I have a fully-functional staff to work with we will assemble such an agenda to present to all of the American people. Without doubt I know that this administration will immediately begin working with the congress restructure and reestablish our monetary and military structures which are currently our top priorities along with the confirmation of judges to the Supreme Court, other high courts, and my cabinet. 

 

I will be in contact with the congress and the Vice President to ensure that we have a full and functioning government as soon as possible. From there, we will begin to govern but we must first have down the basics. I will also begin diplomatic dialogue with the Japanese government and any other foreign state which wishes to establish relations with the United States... I know that this is an uncertain time for everyone, but we have the duty to get back onto our feet and right our wrongs. We have a duty to ourselves, our families, and our neighbors to ensure that we are united as one nation and will make it through this very difficult and confusing time in our history. I will continue to keep the country updated on our progress, but I thank you for tuning in tonight and wish you all plenty of needed sleep. God bless the United States of America." The cameras and lights turned off and the Oval Office momentarily went dark until the room's lights were turned back on. 

 

"Why Mister President, I do declare that was a high and mighty speech especially being improvised at the last second without a speechwriter. I do not think we have been acquainted. I am Mark Anderson of the great State of Georgia, Vice President of these United States."

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The declaration by the Americans had naturally not been a surprise to the Japanese protectorate authority, which had worked heavily in the region, mostly to keep peace, work on promoting new independent governance and dismantling the military-industrial complex. Not to mention, taking into custody the Commonwealths political prisoners, which would be taken to Japan or be freed. Some, like Evangeline Arnault-Delareux, who had been imprisoned in the aftermath of the Laurentine War, would even be given considerable influence in the administration of the American protectorate, due to exceptional willingness to cooperate. Others, like Jade Lithaen, who had not shown much cooperativeness would be transferred to Tokyo Detention House. While a group of Laurentines, not the least Arnault-Delareux, petitioned for  the late President Marston to get tried for Commonwealth attacks on Laurentine civilians, there would be no trial for him. Instead, as soon as the Commonwealth had been occupied, agents of the Chūōchō started discreetly liquidating higher officials of the Commonwealth on the order of Prime Minister Akiyama herself. Well, as discreet as that could happen, the government officials would be visited by armed men in the middle of the night, put into a black van and carried off to the nearest forests to never return.

 

However, while the old Commonwealth structures of political elites and "military-industrial imperialism" was dismantled, new elites would be encouraged to create their own new states and the United States were a welcome first government to arise from the ashes. A congratulary note from the Prime Minister would be forwarded via ambassador Tanaka Shiro to its first President, together with an invitation to a meeting in Tokyo, in order to discuss future relations between the United States and the Japanese Empire.

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The declaration by the Americans had naturally not been a surprise to the Japanese protectorate authority, which had worked heavily in the region, mostly to keep peace, work on promoting new independent governance and dismantling the military-industrial complex. Not to mention, taking into custody the Commonwealths political prisoners, which would be taken to Japan or be freed. Some, like Evangeline Arnault-Delareux, who had been imprisoned in the aftermath of the Laurentine War, would even be given considerable influence in the administration of the American protectorate, due to exceptional willingness to cooperate. Others, like Jade Lithaen, who had not shown much cooperativeness would be transferred to Tokyo Detention House. WhilePre a group of Laurentines, not the least Arnault-Delareux, petitioned for  the late President Marston to get tried for Commonwealth attacks on Laurentine civilians, there would be no trial for him. Instead, as soon as the Commonwealth had been occupied, agents of the Chūōchō started discreetly liquidating higher officials of the Commonwealth on the order of Prime Minister Akiyama herself. Well, as discreet as that could happen, the government officials would be visited by armed men in the middle of the night, put into a black van and carried off to the nearest forests to never return.

 

However, while the old Commonwealth structures of political elites and "military-industrial imperialism" was dismantled, new elites would be encouraged to create their own new states and the United States were a welcome first government to arise from the ashes. A congratulary note from the Prime Minister would be forwarded via ambassador Tanaka Shiro to its first President, together with an invitation to a meeting in Tokyo, in order to discuss future relations between the United States and the Japanese Empire.

 

To Prime Minister Akiyama Kagami

From President Ashton Coolidge 

 

 

Mister Prime Minister,

 

I gratefully accept your invitation to Tokyo. This is a busy time in Washington for everyone but I insisted that we make time to visit with you and your government. Provided that the nation of Tianxia will permit us to fly over the Pacific to meet with you I will leave Washington as soon as possible. Please also give my congratulations to Evangeline Arnault-Delareux on being released from prison. My first executive order was the pardoning of all former Faraway citizens and military personnel and the total commuting of any and all of their prison sentences. I will also be working with the Pentagon to release any relevant information of other high-priority prisoners of war or foreign captives. If your government needs any help finding anyone or anything I will be more than happy to assist in the matter.

 

Best Regards,

 

240px-Seal_of_the_President_of_the_Unite

 

Ashton Coolidge

President of The United States of America

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The Confederacy would like to meet with the United States to discuss many issues, especially the the negotiation of ceding land and establishing clear borders.

 

To The Government of The Confederate States of America

From The State Department of The United States of America

 

To whom it may concern, 

 

President Coolidge sends his best regards to the newly elected leaders of the Confederate States. While this is a very busy time for the American government we would be happy to send a representative to Montgomery or host representatives at the White House in Washington D.C. Once again, congratulations on the establishment of your new government.

 

Regards,

 

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Gabriel Adams

Secretary of State of The United States of America 

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  • 1 month later...

Tanaka Shiro, Japanese Ambassador to Washington, had already handed the Americans many communiques from Tokyo. It had been his responsibility to transmit the declaration of war, but also to hand the new government an invitation to Tokyo. His post had been for a long time one of great importance, as it carried in the past the connotation of being the diplomatic lifeline of relations with a nemesis, then it carried the hope for a new start... but what did the communique in his hands carry now, as he handed in a document from Tokyo for President Coolidge?

 

To Ashton Coolidge, President of the United States of America,

 

While it is a pity that you were unable to see us personally following our last invitation to you, for better or worse, there was nothing much you missed. Still, this does mean that the diplomatic relations between our countries are quite basic and unconductive to the level of cooperation we would wish for. In this sense, I invite you again to visit us in Tokyo, to discuss cooperation between our countries. Should you again find yourself unable to visit, please state so in advance, we shall send you a draft of our envisioned treaty in that case.

 

With regards,

Akiyama Kagami, Prime Minister of Japan

 

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As the Prime Minister had heard that the Americans loved putting large seals on every communique, as if compensating for something, she tried that too and put the Paulownia Seal on the letter. Not that Japan needed that (certainly not on this front), but one was after all willing to show some respect of foreign cultures and be less rude than practically every American diplomat to ever talk to representatives of the Empire since it came into existence.

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To Prime Minister Akiyama Kagami

From President Ashton Coolidge 

 

Prime Minister,

 

I am also sorry that we have yet to meet. Things have been quiet in North America, as long as diplomacy goes between nations, but things have been busy within the United States itself. It's unfortunate that the last meeting between our two countries didn't end up amounting to anything, but I look forward to meeting Your Excellency and other Japanese officials in Tokyo.

 

Best Regards,

 

200px-Seal_of_the_President_of_the_Unite

 

Ashton Coolidge

President of The Untied States of America

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