Jump to content

To the east, to the red dawn.


Zoot Zoot
 Share

Recommended Posts

A telegram would be sent all the way to Beijing, addressed to the highest authority in all of China.

 

To: Deng Xiaoping, President of the People's Republic of China

From: George VI, King of Great Britain and the Empire

 

Subject: Meeting

 

Esteemed and honourable President of the Peoples Republic, I request the honour of a meeting between our states to discuss matters of great importance to both of our states. If you accept, I can make the journey to Beijing, or I can personally accomodate you or a delegation representing you for your period of stay.

 

Signed

HRH George VI

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To: George VI, King of Great Britain and the Empire

From: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People's Republic of China

 

Honored King of Britain,

 

Deng Xiaoping would be honored to meet you, in order to discuss the issues that pertain to the both of our nations. We eagerly await your arrival.

 

Signed,

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People's Republic of China

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The journey would take around two days with several stop offs in many of the Free States dotting the gap between China and Britain on the Royal DC3. Travelling with two of his bodyguards the time would pass slowly between sleep, cards and a few drinks.

 

An hour before landing, the George would change out of his travelling clothes into his full ceremonial uniform. He had to look his best and most respectable for President Deng Xiaoping.

[URL=http://s211.photobucket.com/user/zoot_zoot/media/King_George_VI_of_England_formal_photo_portrait_circa_1940-1946_zps02fe3383.jpg.html]King_George_VI_of_England_formal_photo_p[/URL]

 

Stepping down from his aircraft he took a moment looking out over Beijing airport to ajust his eyes from decsending the steps...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Upon descending from the plane, Zhou Enlai, the Premier of the People's Republic of China and Minister of Foreign Affairs, walked forward to greet the King of Britain. "Welcome to the People's Republic of China." He reached forward to shake the King's hand before leading him to the awaiting motorcade. From there, the delegation would be driven to the Great Hall of the People, where Deng Xiaoping was waiting. After another brief welcoming ceremony, Deng Xiaoping stepped forward, "Welcome, please have a seat."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Following the airport formalities and the journey to the Great Hall, George was feeling quite positive about the meeting which was due to start. His initial nervousness had long since fled as he was made to feel quite welcome by the Chinese.

 

'Mr President, a pleasure to finally meet you and visit your beautiful country. I have to say that I was worried about a frosty reception due to British... interests being spurned by the Americans and a diplomatically costly issue with the French. I had feared our standing in the world had reached a new low and that no state would wish to talk with us, let alone a great power such as the Peoples Republic' he said in English.

 

'I apologise for using my own tongue Mr President, but my Chinese is not good enough and I may very well cause grievious offence, that and my bloody stutter makes it quite difficult conversing in English.' he continued, laughing quietly.

 

'So, I thank you for accepting my invite for talks, even in the event that we do not walk away with any agreement, it was a pleasure to visit China. So my first line of questioning is how would the Peoples Republic feel about entering an economic agreement of sorts with Britain?'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Deng waited for the translator to finish speaking before giving a response. "No need to apologize. Chinese is a very hard language to learn, especially if it's not your native tongue." Deng chuckled, "I could say the same for English; however, I have no intention of ever learning that." He leaned back in his chair and continued to speak, "An economic agreement? What type of agreement do you have in mind. I do find this proposal to be quite interesting..."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

'Well first of all, if you could outline Chinas economic policy Mr President, we can work on creating one which works alongside the Peoples Republics communist ideals. Whilst we are a capitalist country, there is a high demand for chinese produce in British markets, but we must also take into careful consideration the economic policy you have in place so that both of our markets and economies as a whole get the full benefit of such an agreement.' said George, picking his words carefully to make sure nothing was lost in translation.

 

'I also wish to ask what Peoples Republics official position is on a European presence in the Indian region beyond the British Indian Ocean territories which we currently hold as a re-supply port for long distance convoys and aircraft.'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Deng nodded, "Of course, we adhere to the Marxist-Leninist principals. However, we have modified those with our own Chinese characteristics. A nation can't survive closed to the outside world, which is why we have initiated a number of economic changes. We have seen a lot of positive changes, and I'm sure our economy will continue to grow."

 

Deng motioned to one of his assistance, who passed him a small glass of water. "A British presence next to China outside of the Indian Ocean Territories?", He sipped from his glass of water, "That will be as likable as the Treaty of Nanking, the Treaty of Tientsin, and Treaty of Aigun. I will be blunt. Our relations will not reach any significant progression, unless past issues are discussed."

Edited by Malatose
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Then I am sure we can hammer out a mutually beneficial economic relationship, but before we proceed down that line of discussion we must have a most serious discussion regarding these... past issues. I could not in good conscience continue unless they were... put to bed. Mr President, please speak freely so that we may work through our difficult past so that we may work on a better future.'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Deng shifted in his chair, "The Chinese people have suffered a tremendous amount of abuse from the British Empire. The Treaties of  are prime examples of unequal documents. The Chinese people were forced to abide by humiliating terms, which resulted in us having to cede various amounts of territory. This was brought upon us for defending ourselves against substances harmful to the development of our national community. For us to move forward, I feel the British must agree to the following terms. From there, we can move forward in good spirits."

 

Deng drank from his cup of water and began to read over the list.

 

I. The British Empire must declare the Treaties of Nanking, Tientsin, and Aigun to be unfair and unequal documents. As such, both wars known as the Opium Wars, are to be declared unlawful and aggressive wars of expansion and subjugation.

 

II. The British Empire must declare Hong Kong to be a territory of the People's Republic of China.

 

III. The British Empire must repay the 21 million dollar reparations, as noted in the Treaty of Nanking. Adjusted to current inflation, the reparations requested will be equal to and no greater than $326,000,000.

Edited by Malatose
Link to comment
Share on other sites

George listened carefully as the President finished before formulating his own response.

 

'Those can be done apart from declaring Honk Kong the territory of the Peoples Republic. I say that because Hong Kong is not British territory any longer, nor do we have any influence over the city. I mean, I could declare it Chinese but it wouldn't mean much unless the Peoples Republic actually claimed it Mr President.' said George, sitting back in his chair for a moment to think.

 

'Mr President I do offer my most sincere apologies for the sins of my predecessors and on behalf of Westminister I apologise for Britains actions taken against the Chinese people.' he continued sadly as he remembered his history.

 

He pulled out a chequebook and wrote out the sum of money from his personal account. He knew Westminister would never agree to that much money, even if the cost would be offset by a trade agreement with China.

 

'Mr President, take this, it is a £150,000,000 cheque from my personal account. Britains Kings have influence in Westminister, but not enough to get them to pay such a fortune, so I will foot half the bill myself as a gesture of good will and a way of taking a direct portion of responsibility.' he said, as he ducked his down down again for write another one from the Government account to make up the shortfall.

 

'I hope this is acceptable Mr President?'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

'I propose a simple free trade agreement to begin with, allowing British merchants to operate in China, in compliance with your laws of course, and in return, the same gesture is returned for Chinese traders to operate in any part of the Empire as well as take shelter in any british controlled port. The finer details of such an agreement I am sure can be hammered out by our respective financial experts Mr President, I am no numerical genius myself, but I was given a few drafts to bring with me to read over. They all outline basic trade principles, mutual permissions for trading licences in compliance with local laws when applicable and a few articles on market regulation to ensure the merchants dont get greedy and try and do us both our of income taxes' he finished, laughing at the end.

 

'Mr President how does that sound?'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Hmm, I would like to view those drafts. After viewing them, I will have my Minister of Commerce glance over it to make the necessary changes. However, I must warn you.  Yes, I might support this document; but my colleagues might not. Most are still weary of the British due to past actions. I'm sure you understand."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

'Hopefully my gesture and guarantee will be enough for the moment to be used as a foundation for the rebuilding of such damaged relationships Mr President. The re-development of diplomatic relations must start somewhere and a trade agreement is as good a place as any.' said George, adjusting his position in the seat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

'Indeed Mr President' said George, pulling out the relevent draft from his briefcase, unfortunately it was written in English for fear that some daft scribe in Westminister would misplace a character and ruin everything.

 

'So, Mr President, how agreeable would you be to allowing Britain to move into southern India, specifically the regions of Kerala and Tamil Nadu. I know you said it was not a likable proposal earlier, but I believe that if the Peoples Republic see's with its own eyes how we wish to right our wrongs, especially in India, a land that propsered at the cost of its natives" he reflected sadly, looking at his feet before meeting Xiaoping's gaze.

 

'Then we might actually make real progress towards healing old wounds beyond financial reparation. Actions and statements only go so far Mr President, it is my duty as King to ensure my people act as they have done elsewhere in the Empire, especially in South Africa and hopefully, with your blessing, Southern India.'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Deng nodded, "I was the under the impression that an economic agreement was supposed to benefit both parties. However, according to the document that you have just read, the United Kingdom will gain access to various provinces in Southern India; while, China will gain nothing. Perhaps, I am jumping to conclusions." Deng sipped from his glass of water, "I hope I am wrong."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

'I was under the impression that India and the region as a whole as it happens fell under the Chinese sphere of influence, so I considered that it would be disrespectful to offer territory that we have no right giving away. Britain would be unopposed to any Chinese expansion in India and the wider region as a whole Mr President. It would be like your next door neighbor giving you permission to have a party on your own lawn sir.' said George with a light laugh.

 

'With the utmost respect, I didn't consider it worth bringing up as I thought it would cause nothing but offence. What would China ask of Britain it return for the Indian provinces?'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...