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Meeting of the Iranians


Yerushalayim
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Ambassador Sirin Diyar arrived in the Persian capital, having taken a coach from her home in Hewler. The trip had been long, far longer than the trips enjoyed by the counterparts she knew had been sent to Egypt and the Ottomans. Once she arrived, however, she knew that the wait had been worth it. The Persians were kin to the Kurds, and she took the chance to marvel at their architecture, garb, and food. She stopped to purchase some local food before making her way, at last, to the structure in which her meeting was to take place.

 

Once within, flanked by two guards, she made her way to the meeting hall and greeted the Persian Foreign Minister in Farsi, “Peace be upon you, Minister Zarif. It's my pleasure, and my honour, to be here today.” She took a seat and settled a folder on the table before her. “Kurdistan has several issues which we would like to discuss with Persia. To begin with, Kurdistan would like to broach the idea of a rail line linking Kurdistan with Persia. The Kurdish National Rail Corporation is already at work constructing a rail line within Kurdistan, and connecting our nation to the Ottomans; with a basic investment from the Persian government we could ensure that the rail line also connects to the major Persian cities, or rail network.” She withdrew a paper and placed it on the table for the Foreign Minister to examine, which detailed the expected construction times and costs if such an endeavor were undertaken.

 

“In addition to this, Kurdistan would like to negotiate an agreement on oil prices, as both Persia and Kurdistan control large portions of the world's oil supply, and are the largest suppliers that have drawn themselves out of the anarchy that has plagued the world. Rather than undercut one another's economies, Kurdistan would much rather have a friendly agreement with Persia in order to ensure that both our nations prosper and benefit from the development and sale of petrol products.”

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The Foreign Minister examined the paper.

 

"We have actually just begun work on building a national rail network for Persia. I believe that my government will be more than happy to link it up with the Kurdish railway. As for oil agreements, what does Kurdistan have in mind?"

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Ambassador Diyar nodded polite as the Foreign Minister spoke to her. "I see. Well, I am pleased to hear that Persia's rail network is already being constructed. Let us cooperate to ensure that our networks have similar enough standards so that there are no issues connecting them when the time comes. As for oil, let us form a joint commission on oil prices, to meet once a month and determine the price of oil for that month. Then our nations will both sell at this price, and both will profit, yes?"

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"Persia would be happy to be a part of such a commission. As for the railways, I'm sure that our Ministry of Transportation would be willing to work with their Kurdish counterparts to ensure that everything goes to plan.

 

Perhaps Kurdistan would be interested in a non-aggression pact in addition to what we have already discussed today?"

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"Kurdistan is always open to peaceful and prosperous relations with our neighbors in the region. We would be more than willing to enter into such a pact with Persia. However, I must warn you that Kurdistan has several conditions that we would consider to be a violation of the pact from Persia's end; notably, should Persia engagein acts of genocide or religious persecution, we will no longer consider any non-aggression agreement to be in place. If this is acceptable to Persia, then let us draft up the agreement posthaste."

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"That is entirely understandable."

 

Persia-Kurdistan Agreement

 

1. Non-Agression

 

Both signatories agree to handle their disputes peacefully, and agree to not take aggressive military, political, or economic actions towards one another. This clause is considered to be void if either signatory engages in acts of genocide or religious persecution.

 

2. Oil-Committee

 

Both signatories agree to meet at least once a month in order to set prices on oil exports.

 

3. Transportation

 

Both signatories agree to cooperate on the setting-up of a joint rail network.

 

Signed for Persia,

Mohammed Zarif, Foreign Minister

 

Signed for Kurdestan,

 

 

"Feel free to make any edits that you feel are necessary."

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