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The Sun Rises over the Andes


Evangeline Anovilis
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Since the Bolivian intervention, already months had passed. The weapons of mass destruction had been evacuated, production facilities had been demolished and plans for the production of nuclear weaponry had been burned to ashes. Chico alto, once maybe the pride of a rogue regime was now nothing more but a sad note in history books, explaining the reason why military police of the Imperial Commonwealth now upheld order in the streets of La Paz. But while first provisory measures had been taken to ensure that Bolivians could live somewhat normal lives, many in Dai-Tōhoku were unsure about the future of the country.

 

With war looming at other edges of the Imperial Commenwealth, Lt. General Ozawa Rentaro, head of the Kaiheitai, which had been stationed in the theater as intervention force by Dai-Tōhoku was not too enthusiastic about what he called a "a bottomless pit for Imperial troops and money". Stationed thousands of miles away from home, Bolivia was now an investment with little return, as maybe order existed, but neither existed a functional government, nor a working economy, after the old system collapsed with the military junta.

 

Classified Report from Bolivian Restoration Army Headquarters

 

As detailed in the last report, the Bolivian economy has came to a halt with the ongoing occupation and the lack of clarity on the future of the country. The political elite, most of which backed the old regime, has to a great extent been interned, awaiting trial and it cannot be expected that any local government will be formed anytime soon. As it stands, the Bolivian territory eats up our limited military funding without providing anything in return. Personal and ressources are wasted in an eternal peacekeeping mission.

 

My personal recommendation is that a political solution is to be found with the Imperial court. As it stands, it is to be feared that the moment our troops remove their presence, either the country devolves into chaos, if it is not taken over by reactionary elements again, or South american neighbours will attempt to integrate Bolivia into their systems. While however neither of these results is acceptable, continuation of occupation alone will merely destroy what remains of the economy and thus I argue that some lasting way of guaranteeing Imperial influence is found, if necessary by mounting the Rising Sun banner at every flag pole.

 

Ozawa Rentaro

 

 

As the communique was sent home via plane, Ozawa went back to his office with high hopes. Over time, he had learned to whom he had to send his reports, in order to have them arrive in the hands of the conservatives in Sendai and while it had already been shown in an earlier report by an inspector, that Ozawa portrayed the economic situation as worse than it actually was (though an economic decline could still be felt), the right-wing knew how to use their political networks.

 

[hr]

 

Confidential!

To His Imperial Highness, Yuan Jia I, Emperor of all the Lands beneath the Heavens

 

In my most humble function as mediator between His Imperial Highness and his loyal subjects of the Dai-Tōhoku Renpō, I would like to present before the Emperor the issue of the Bolivian territory, which up to now has not seen any betterment since the intervention by soldiers of the Commonwealth have restored peace and order to United Bolivia. With the Security Council being mostly reserved on this issue and up to now no indegenous and trustworthy government having been formed, it is the recommendation of the government to His Imperial Highness, that an integration of Bolivia in the Realms ruled directly by the Empire be in order, in order to ensure continued stability and well-being in the region. As a member of the Imperial Commonwealth, the assent of His Imperial Highness is needed to allow us to plan for such a measure.

 

We think such a measure drastic, but prudent, in the face of the events that led up to the intervention, which quite clearly showed a more than inept regional community, that not only showed a certain hostility towards the Empire during the intervention, but keeps a passive-aggressive opposition even these days. It is thus not responsible to remove Imperial influence from the South American mainland. Additionally would we recommend to the Emperor this measure in light of the continued costs stemming from the pacification of such a territory. We would suggest, in the name of the Emperor and the Japanese people to proclaim Imperial protection also over the people of Bolivia and to allow for the establishment of a long-term regime by our authorities, in order to facilitate efficient and lasting protection over Bolivia.

 

With our most humble regards,

Konoe Nobuhisa

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"You can't be serious.", Officer Nishimura yelled at his superior. For once he forgot the chain of cammand, as he received his orders from Ozawa. "I am serious. The Kaiheitai will move to secure the Bolivian littoral." Nishimura breated heavily. "But Lt. General, isn't this claimed by..." Ozawa's piercing glare came to rest upon Nishimura as the greyed beard of the general shook and he cut of Nishimura. "There was no claim. If there was, they can take it up with whomever afterwards. But we ought to secure the coast now!" "This is not within the mandate!" "As if anything here is now regulated by any mandate... It's beneath the heavens, so it is part of the Emperors mandate. Now go seize it or I'll have you court-martialed." Nishimura shook his head. "I just hope that this will not cost us dearly."

 

Ozawa however merely took out a map of the continent. With one swift stroke from the Bolivian border, the Littoral was theirs. This was just about as legitimate as any other claim to Ozawa, but at the end of the day... facts had been created and at home they would no longer be able to ignore the issue at hand. If this succeeded, the access to the Sea was secure, travel from and to Sendai was then possible without interference. If he failed... he would at least have gone down with dignity in the service of the Emperor, he thought.

 

[hr]

 

Within hours, the Kaiheitai was on the march to cross the border, in order to occupy the Bolivian Littoral, or what they perceived as it. A column of Type 10 MBTs and Type 89 IFVs rolled along the streets towards Antofagasta, to occupy the town, before any other party could reach it. Soldiers would occupy administrative buildings and military police would try to organise the continuation of normal life, as far as this was possible. This meddling was maybe a dangerous gambit, but it was one that the overly eager General Ozawa Rentaro made.

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Back in Sendai, the somewhat independent actions of Lt. General Ozawa were seen much less as heroic, than as downright dangerous. The Jiyuto demanted answers in the Diet, answers most in the Minshuto did not have and which even the Hoshuto could partially not deliver. It was a mess by all means. Still, it was a mess behind closed doors. The situation was not at all suited for the outside world to know how controversial these actions were, even within Dai-Tōhoku. Minister Nakamichi argued for caution, given the diplomatic repercussions of causing an incident. Fukishi talked of military weaknesses and even started to present plans of his predecessor Date for a military build-up, which he said would be necessary. Meanwhile, Prime Minister Omura stood silent, as his cabinet seemed to fall apart, the Minshuto minister Mori likening the situation to the actions of the infamous Kantogun that had already once ruined Japan by throwing it into wars with China, which of course caused a slight uproar. Most rather not talked about any of that history that caused so much grief for the relations between Japan and the continent. Still, it was undeniable, there was something that needed to be done. a course had to be found in the issue that would turn the whole issue in Dai-Tōhoku's favor.

 

[hr]

 

In Dai-Tōhoku itself, mobilisation of forces had already started and in Niigata, Sendai and Aomori thousands were loaded onto ships for transport to the far fringes of the Empire. Reluctantly the Diet had agreed to reinforce the Kaiheitai and army brigades in Bolivia by an additional 60,000 that were to be shipped there from Sendai, to increase the overall size of forces in the theater to 105,000. The flotilla that had already participated in the intervention at its start, was recalled to Galapagos, in order to be ready for whatever conflict could transpire and even the Dai-Tōhoku Kūgun was to increase its force to an overall of ten wings within Bolivia.

 

The Diet had however not agreed to reinforcements blindly. The authority of the central government over the armed forces had been challenged and it was not to be taken lightly. To defend the current position within South America, Ozawa had been sacked and replaced by a man of whom Sendai hoped to see a more cautious and law-abiding course of action. General Kuroda Kojirō was to lead the occupation force from now on.

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As the Imperial communique reached Sendai, Konoe Nobuhisa saluted and gave word to the government and military. His secretary would later state that he uttered "Well, if the Emperor agrees, it must be a decent idea..."

 

In Bolivia itself, the authorities of the Dai-Tōhoku Renpō started with their work to incorporate the territory into their state. Busy administrators carried together the documents confiscated by the occupation forces, detailing census data, land ownership, registers and whatever could contribute to the success of the overseas territory. Military Police officers would hand out leaflets to inform the people of the intented changes in governance. People were gathered together to be able to listen to the broadcast of the newly appointed Governor-General.

 

[hr]

 

ZZfzkKNl.png

 

Gathered before the Palacio Quemado was a small crowd, as well as an improvised stage, with microphone. Kuroda Kojirō had just been sent to the region, when he suddenly had gotten news that he was now to administer the region for the Dai-Tōhoku Renpō. A hastily written speech before him and a wondering platoon of soldiers behind him, Kuroda wondered about what strange ways fate sometimes took. He shook for a last time his head, before walking up to the podium to hold his speech.

 

"Bolivians, I, today, have come, to announce, a decision, which has been made on the territory of Bolivia, also regarding its future within this world. The soldiers of the far away Empire of Tianxia and Dai-Tōhoku have arrived here a year ago, in order to vanquish a regime, which may have been proclaiming glory, but has brought upon Bolivia naught but shame, poverty, death and misfortune. The soldiers that have come back then, partially are still here today, as they try to prevent such terrible history from repeating itself.

 

However, from this day on, the occupation of Bolivia will end, for it has been decided by His Imperial Majesty, the Emperor of all Lands beneath the Heavens, Great Khan of the Horde, Emperor of Japan, Son of the Heavens, and so on and so forth, that Bolivia will join the Pacifican family of nations that are gathered in the great house of the Imperial Commonwealth. The territory of Bolivia, with its people and posessions, from this day on, shall form part of the Dai-Tōhoku Renpō, be under the Imperial protection of the Commonwealth and be regarded as brothers and sisters of all the other peoples that live under the Emperors benevolent and enlightened rule.

 

Tennō Heika Banzai!"

 

Kuroda would salute and turn to a nearby flag pole, where the new flag of so-called Minami-Kechua  was raised (distinctively different from the flag of another people known for maize and turnips) and as the Pacific March was played, the platoon in the background too saluted the flag and Emperor. Indeed, the Imperial lifeline had been extented...

 

The speech would be broadcasted by NHK around the world.

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Classified

 

While diplomatic efforts were still ongoing, Kuroda would prepare his soldiers for the very real possibility of having to wage a war against the Republica, most likely with Paraguayan assistance, if not even Athenian one, given the Athenian Federation seemed to have a certain interest in the region. But while it was expected that in case of escalation, Tianxian support would be present, Kuroda could expect to be outnumbered. Good use of the few troops he had would in any war thus be of utmost importance and any mistake that wasted his assets could prove detrimental.

 

For the better or worse, Kuroda would concentrate his troops in the mountainous west, though the remaining country would still see small bands of units spread over the whole area. In general, as attacks on the chain of command were to be expected, officers and NCOs were issued directives on what to do in case of being isolated and cut off from the rest of the armed forces and they were to give similar directives to their soldiers. Larger concentrations of force were hardly present though, with only one exception. In the Southern regions, around Sucre and Potosi, Kuroda ordered the bulk of all armored and mechanised forces to gather, though with efforts to concel their presence in woods, bushes, behind hills and with camouflage nets. To avoid detection of such efforts, columns would drive during night-time, with lights off, using night-vision gear and the vehicle in front as navigation assistance to not come off the roads. During the day, only trucks and single IFVs would be active, which was deemed unlikely to arouse suspicion.

 

While the army would move into position and officers would survey the land they may be supposed to fight in, Defense Intelligence Headquarters would start the gathering of intelligence on the enemy. Via open source intelligence and SATINT, airfields would be mapped out and a list of them with coordinates would be compiled. Maps would be drawn up of Paraguay, with the most important visible infrastructure. During the search, the DIH would also keep an eye out for additional military activities, which were expected, due to the ambivalent relations with the new neighbour and their support for the Republica and its claim. In the Gran Chaco plain, the DHI would note a higher volume of logistical transportation, as well as increased activity in the northern military bases of Paraguay. Rough estimates would be drawn up, based on size of installations, known army sizes and a bit of guessing and maps, as well as intelligence reports were sent to Kuroda in multiple encrypted packages, as well as one analogous version via a Kawasaki C-2., also containing a good bit of sake for the troops.

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With Paraguay once again throwing accusations at the Empire, Kuroda had to take measures. No longer could be assumed that Paraguay would peacefully support the order that was brought to Bolivia, as it was phrased by the Paraguayan Catholic Church right after the annexation, but rather, the military police and the local branch of the Public Security Intelligence Agency would be secretely tasked to keep an eye on all the Paraguayan Catholic Church activities within Bolivia. While the Church would be allowed to operate, in accordance with freedom of religion, there was to be no freedom of espionage and all masses, processions, funerals, baptisms, even confessions were under surveillance. Priests would be asked to hand over the church for a full day, for the installations of security devices and were required to fill out a form everytime they were planning to conduct affairs outside their churches.

 

Travel to and from Paraguay was restricted, with a new requirement for Paraguayan priests to announce to the Minami-Kechua authoritries their intention to enter the territory at least one year prior to visiting and their intent to leave at least three days before leaving. Their luggage of course would be searched at the border, under the guise of import and export restrictions, countering drug trafficking and preventing circumvention of tariffs. Internet would be prohibited to Paraguayan priests and any letters were secretely going through a bureau for censorship, which would decide whether the letter would arrive or "get lost in the administrative chaos inherited from the fall of United Bolivia".

 

Any kind of subversive activity, espionage and sabotage would lead of course to arrest.

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TO: Government of Dai-Tōhoku
FROM: Secretariat of State
SUBJ: Bolivian Church

To whom it may concern,

Recent measures implemented by the temporary government of Bolivia is outrageous and a violation of privacy and religious freedom. The Catholic Church of Christ is independent from ANY government and in no way shape or form shares the views of the Paraguayan government. We have publicly stated our support for your government's role in the daily security and order of the Bolivian people. Such treatment by your government upon our bishops and priests is unacceptable. We will not concede to any such demands as some violate our most sacred doctrines, especially those concerning the Sacrament of Reconciliation. We also would like to remind the government that priests, and even bishops, are not just of Paraguayan decent but also Bolivian. We will not meddle in international events unless they directly hinder our ability to minister to the poor and vulnerable. Any priest who allows your officials into our churches in order to install any illicit electronic monitoring device will be immediately excommunicated and removed of all his facilities.

In order to have an open dialogue and to discuss your concerns Pope John Paul III would like to send Cardinal Bishop Gregorio Pedro, Secretary of State, to Sendai or Bolivia to have discussions.

Signed by the following with the Blessings of His Holiness John Paul III,

Arch. Fresco Camino, Secretary of External Relations
Archbishop Fernando Cardinal Marcia , Metropolitan Archdiocese of San Tomas, Paraguay
Archbishop Agustín Rodríguez, Metropolitan Archdiocese of Santa Cruz, Bolivia
Bishop Ricardo Rubio, Diocese of San Andres, Bolivia
Bishop Franco Manzano, Diocese of Beni, Bolivia
Bishop Bonifacio Celis, Diocese of Pando, Bolivia

Edited by lkfht
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Confidential reply

 

While we value the freedom of people to pursue whatever believe allows them to live a happier spiritual life, such freedom still has to stay within secular law. In your case, the Ministry of the Interior sadly has determined, that while certain independence is present, the Paraguayan Catholic Church or the Catholic Church of Christ presenting a hostile state with information or a platform to spread subversive propaganda disturbing social peace is a very real possibility. Thus, as a preventive measure, we have decided to implement these measures. If they do not conform with your sacred doctrine, please make sure that these doctrines are in line with our law. We will not compromise our national security because a network of people, with their head being an influential Paraguayan, wants to act in accordance to a sacred doctrine that is not conforming with our laws. This is not negotiable and will only be lifted once the threat of information falling into enemy hands is banished.

 

Signed,

Kuroda Kojirō

 

P.S.: We are aware of the fact that we are partially surveilling our own civilians with this measure.

 

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It appears the that there have been those who have forgotten that in this realm, Caesar and not Church is supreme in temporal matters and that that right has been ordained by god.  No man, whomever he claims may alter it.  Any excommunication or treason against the crown is a sin against god, emperor, and country. Any priest would do well to think on that before they take another step towards chaos.

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"Your god is not our God. We will not act to please the powerful but rather in accordance with our faith and the truth that comes from it. We will not back down on your threat to survaillance our churches and so the sacrament of penance will not occur in a church facility but rather in common place. All other sacraments are allowed to occur inside the churches. No government will dictate to the Holy Father how to run the church for it is not a political institution but rather a religious entity who is on the side of peace."

- Arch. Fresco Camino, Secretary of External Relations

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"We would like to point out that such activity related to the church, but not carried out in the church is required to be reported to the local government authorities, so it can be put under survellance. Should the Catholic Church of Christ not be transparent about these affairs, there will be legal consequences, ranging from fines to arresting the responsible clergymen, if found guilty."

-Satō Tomoya, Magistrate for Religious and Ideological matters of Minami-Kechua

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"We would like to point out that such activity related to the church, but not carried out in the church is required to be reported to the local government authorities, so it can be put under survellance. Should the Catholic Church of Christ not be transparent about these affairs, there will be legal consequences, ranging from fines to arresting the responsible clergymen, if found guilty."

-Satō Tomoya, Magistrate for Religious and Ideological matters of Minami-Kechua

 

"We will not under any circumstances concede to your demands. Your demands violate our religious rights and the rights of our clergy. We cannot in good conscience allow our churches to be monitored during the Sacrament of Reconciliation. We have no problem if you would like to monitor the celebration of the Eucharist, funerals, weddings, or any other sacrament, but not confession.

 

Furthermore your demands violate the Declaration of Human Rights set forth by the United Nations, your nation in which is a member of the UNSC."

 

- Arch. Fresco Camino, Secretary of External Relations

Edited by lkfht
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"No. Your religion is tolerated and people are not persecuted based on religious beliefs. However we will not alter our laws based on your religious doctrine. We uphold our seperation of church and state and your church will either bend to law based on rational concerns, or you will carry the consequences when we see no reason to fold to your beliefs in unproven existences. Buddhist, Shintō and other religions in Minami-Kechua also don't get freedoms based on irrational religious doctrine."

-Satō Tomoya, Magistrate for Religious and Ideological matters of Minami-Kechua

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"No. Your religion is tolerated and people are not persecuted based on religious beliefs. However we will not alter our laws based on your religious doctrine. We uphold our seperation of church and state and your church will either bend to law based on rational concerns, or you will carry the consequences when we see no reason to fold to your beliefs in unproven existences. Buddhist, Shintō and other religions in Minami-Kechua also don't get freedoms based on irrational religious doctrine."

-Satō Tomoya, Magistrate for Religious and Ideological matters of Minami-Kechua

"This is absolutely insulting to our faith, to the Holy Father, and to all of its believers. We will not concede to your demands, as they violate our conscience. Our clergy have taken the sacred vow of obedience to the Magistarium and will only concede to them.

 

St. Thomas Moore once said, "I die the king's good servant, but God is first."

 

- Cardinal Bishop Gregorio Pedro, Secretary of State

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"We cannot with good conscience concede to your fundemantalist views. Our politics are in the service of the people and the Emperor, both of which profit from continued public safety and which both are very real entities. If the Catholic Church of Christ wants to call our vows to the Emperor and the People inferior to its own vows to a Magistrarium and its unproven divine entity, then we would hope that it moderates its tone, as it just proves the rebellious tendencies we suspected of it."

-Satō Tomoya, Magistrate for Religious and Ideological matters of Minami-Kechua

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"We cannot with good conscience concede to your fundemantalist views. Our politics are in the service of the people and the Emperor, both of which profit from continued public safety and which both are very real entities. If the Catholic Church of Christ wants to call our vows to the Emperor and the People inferior to its own vows to a Magistrarium and its unproven divine entity, then we would hope that it moderates its tone, as it just proves the rebellious tendencies we suspected of it."

-Satō Tomoya, Magistrate for Religious and Ideological matters of Minami-Kechua

 

"We are not making a political statement, nor taking anyone's side in politics. We are simply wishing to exercise our right to minister to the poor and vulnerable without government interference. His Holiness, Pope John Paul III is currently in Africa, however when he returns he wishes to go to Bolivia to meet with its bishops, and with government officials."

 

- Arch. Fresco Camino, Secretary of External Relations

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"We hereby declare Pope John Paul III a persona non grata and extent this status also to all his successors, until such a time that the Pope officially pledges to stay neutral in political issues and accept that even his church has to bend to Imperial law, in the same sense as everyone. Should he be caught entering our territory without permission, we preserve the right to arrest John Paul III and to repatriate him to Paraguay. This is not up for negotiaion!"

-Satō Tomoya, Magistrate for Religious and Ideological matters of Minami-Kechua

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"If the Catholic Church of Christ wants to imply our laws being injustice, then it can just stay out of our country. We don't need sects that threaten public order and the safety of the people and state."

-Satō Tomoya, Magistrate for Religious and Ideological matters of Minami-Kechua

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"Your laws have been just, except for the one that orders our priests to allow government agents to install electronic monitoring devices in our confessionals. This law violates our religious rights to be able to freely exercise our religion. We will not abandon the Bolivian people. And just to let you know, we have been in Bolivia much longer than your temporary government."

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Altough the Magistrate would not bother to reply any longer to such ridiculous argumentation, the CCC would soon see that it being in Bolivia for a longer time meant little to the government authorities. Priests who violated the law by opposing transparency measures would simply be arrested, if they were Bolivian they would be trialed according to the new laws, if they were Paraguayan, they'd be taken into custody. Depending on the number of Paraguayan citizens affected (OOC: If it's more than one, please state so), plans were made to contact the Paraguayan government for extradition.

 

Meanwhile, the first plans for the administration would be drawn up, envisioning a seperate constitution and system of laws enacted for the new territory, to acknowledge the differences in culture, demography and social structures between the home islands and the Andean territories. Of course, fundamental principles,. like the declaration of human rights and seperation of church and state would be transferred simply from the home islands to Minami-Kechua, but already in matters of language, while all official communication in Dai-Tōhoku was to be held in Japanese, the official languages of Minami-Kechua were Japanese, Spanish and a number of selected Andean indegenous languages. Similarly, immigration policies would be differing, as Minami-Kechua by all means was not seen as part of the Japanese nation and it was defined instead as an autonomous nation of indegenous Andean peoples.

 

Economically, the situation improved only slightly, as investors in Dai-Tōhoku were reserved about putting money into a powder keg and rather waited for a bit, to see how far the aggressiveness of the South American neighbours went.

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"Depending on the number of Paraguayan citizens affected (OOC: If it's more than one, please state so), plans were made to contact the Paraguayan government for extradition."

Yes it would concern more than one Paraguayan citizen.

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To: The Paraguayan Ministry of Foreign Affairs

From: The Office of the High Commissioner of Minami-Kechua

 

To whomever it concerns,

 

We would like to inform your government that several of your citizens have broken our laws and that they are about to face a trial. While we do not have any extradition treaty, these people are not accused of major crimes and we does would like to offer to the Paraguayan government the extradition of these citizens, in exchange for the following treaty.

 

 

Paraguay-Kechua Agreement on the Treatment and Extradition of Prisoners of the other Nationality

 

Article I

 

Both parties agree to extradite any convicts with citizenship in the other country, as long as these convicts have not been accused of murder, high treason, espionage, sabotage, subversive activity or which are prisoners of war (in which case they are covered by the rights given to prisoners of war) to the other country.

 

Article II

 

Both parties agree that any convicts with citizenship in the other country, but which neither are prisoners of war, not qualify for extradition according to Article I will be treaded humanely, not subject to any forced labour or the death penalty.

 

Article III

 

This agreement can be cancelled by either party, but notice has to be given a year (OOC: 1 month IRL) prior.

 

Signatories

 

For Minami-Kechua,

Kuroda Kojirō, High Commisioner of Minami-Kechua

 

For Paraguay,

 

 

With regards,

Kuroda Kojirō

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