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Edinburgh conferences.


lordliam
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[quote]Edinburgh International Airport Air Traffic Control here. Irish C-130 you are cleared to land on Scotia Air Force Base Edinburgh South. The President and a few fellow Senators are waiting to meet the Irish delegation. Have a nice stay here in Scotia![/quote]

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The Prime Minister and his party quickly land and enjoy the scenery as they are escorted to the meeting site by a finely turned out team of Scottish Guardsmen. Once they have arrived they take their seats and pull out numerous papers and maps. Upon completion of this fussy ritual they wait for the Scottish government to begin as the opening traditionally goes to the host government.

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The room was large and well-lit with ceiling lights. Harsh, bright lights. Anxious lights. The floral prints on the walls betrayed the piece's original purpose of the conference room as a dancehall from centuries past. But that was then and this is now. The delegation was small. It didn't need be large. The Minister of Trade, Foreign Relations, Natural Resources, President Sinclair and Chairman Sutherland of Scotia Oil were all there. The President clearly thought that the extra bodies were unnecessary but the rest of his cabinet insisted. He was in no position to oppose and in any case it would be a lot more trouble than it was worth. So instead he decided to try and hit as many points as possible to stop the others from talking.

"Welcome Mr. Prime Minister. I'm quite glad that you could attend today. There are a few things on the agenda that I would like to discuss with you. I'm sure these are also at the top of your list. I'm sure you've heard about Scotia Oil Rig One. We'd be overjoyed if you would sign a trade agreement with us for energy. There's a lot of black gold under the North Sea and with Irish investments we can all contribute to the energy independence of the British Isles as well as provide cheap fuel and growth for both our nations. Second is perhaps defence. It's no secret that Scotia's army is currently weak. It does seem like we're trying to mooch and pressure you into helping our young nation but you have to understand our position. I'm sure that the Germans aren't looking at us too kindly and there's no telling what the English might want to do to us at the moment." The President took a deep breath. "I truly thank you again for coming. You do realize that the Irish are perhaps our only option at the moment but I assure your delegation again that your efforts will be repaid in kind soon enough."

The rest of the delegation felt rather offended that the President wouldn't let them have a chance at opening remarks but they were soon enough slowly introduced. The men were wrought with nervousness but they all feigned calmness and excitement. Sutherland clasped his hands together as the President spoke and stared across the table. His scraggy chin showed wisdom but his eyes were filled with contempt for the man who waxed poetic endlessly at his expense.

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[quote][color=#282828][font=helvetica, arial, sans-serif]"Welcome Mr. Prime Minister. I'm quite glad that you could attend today. There are a few things on the agenda that I would like to discuss with you. I'm sure these are also at the top of your list. I'm sure you've heard about Scotia Oil Rig One. We'd be overjoyed if you would sign a trade agreement with us for energy. There's a lot of black gold under the North Sea and with Irish investments we can all contribute to the energy independence of the British Isles as well as provide cheap fuel and growth for both our nations. Second is perhaps defence. It's no secret that Scotia's army is currently weak. It does seem like we're trying to mooch and pressure you into helping our young nation but you have to understand our position. I'm sure that the Germans aren't looking at us too kindly and there's no telling what the English might want to do to us at the moment." The President took a deep breath. "I truly thank you again for coming. You do realize that the Irish are perhaps our only option at the moment but I assure your delegation again that your efforts will be repaid in kind soon enough."[/font][/color][/quote]

"I'm sure that with the right business structure in place that the Irish Government would be interested in investing a joint venture for the purpose of extracting oil and refining it for sale. That would be the maximum, at the minimum we are interesting in purchasing oil from the North Sea. As for your military situation, Ireland could assist your nation with the improving of your forces via the investment of money into the North Sea Oil extractions. The growth of jobs will increase your tax revenue, which ought to make more funds available to your government for military use. Directly, we could sign a non-aggression pact and expand it to a PIAT, which would provide for the sharing of aid and intelligence between our two nations. Aid could come in the form of allowing Scottish Officers to be trained in Ireland and Irish equipment provided to Scotland," Prime Minister Best responded. He's not entirely keen on a full defense treaty until he's seen the stability of the new Scottish nation over the long term.

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  • 2 weeks later...

"We understand that you're concerned about our political status. That's to be expected. Alright it seems as though we have agreed that we are interested in pursuing some sort of economic deal involving our oil, is that correct? Well then what would you say to a proposal that we go visit the rig itself?"

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"That won't be necessary, the Irish Intelligence Division has provided me with up to date sattelite reconnisance photography of ever step of the building and day to day progress of the rig. I'm fairly well versed in the specifics of the facility. We do wish an economic pact and propose a joint venture between ourselves and possibly including the English to improve oil production in the North Sea. It is the opinion of the Irish government that Scotland will play a pivotal role in the North Sea oil extraction due to it's proximity, which means a massive investment in the infrastructure of refining, storage, and transport of oil and oil products. What the Irish government wishes to see is two things, first a number for how much money this is going to require and second a formal document establishing a jointly owned venture between the Irish and Scottish. Once that's established or during, it hardly matters to us, we wish that the English be invited to invest and comment on the specifics of the joint venture as well given they have an obvious interest in the North Sea," Prime Minister Best replied.

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Finally, Chairman Sutherland rose to the occasion and decided to speak. "Ahem, it seems to me that what the Irish delegation is trying to imply is that this venture will be jointly operated. I'm sorry but the rig is squarely in our exclusive economic zone, a little way off the territorial waters. I doubt that there will be any chance to cooperate on the project. As you know, production is actually slated to begin soon. The only problem is that there is a lack of consumption in Scotia itself. If the rig were to open, it would most likely lead to a loss for Scotia Oil. What we have offered here is energy security, not a business opportunity, is that correct, Mr. President?"

President Sinclair very obviously wanted to cooperate with the Irish, but the rig was already built and financed with Scotian Pounds. It was very unlikely that Scotia Oil would want to risk shipping product all over the world though, so what it truly wanted was perhaps a couple of safe customers so that Scotia's economy would finally get going again after years of festering under German protection. "It does seem like now there is a death of opportunities to cooperate on the rig itself, but would the Irish delegation be interested in a joint pipeline for delivery, perhaps? Thus the dollar value for the rig itself would be zero, since it's close to being finished in any case. The pipeline however, that's perhaps a different story."

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Most of the Scotian delegation was taken slightly aback. Chairman Sutherland quickly recovered though, and continued: "Well then that's another matter altogether. I'd assume that we weren't thinking big enough up to now. It is true that we would like to develop as much of the field as possible, yes. But financing has been a problem. Are you sure that there is enough demand for our product at this time for it to be worth the investment?" The Chairman knew that Scotia's oil was perhaps the only thing it had going, so he was careful to make it seem like he would give up control of the lion's share of benefits to a foreign entity, no matter how friendly.

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