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Ancient Blood Connections


Kankou
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Special Representative Kim Suro looked out the window as he landed in Cochin City, musing of history and relatives.

Korea's relationship with the region extends back to 48AD, when Princess Heo Hwang-ok travelled from the kingdom of Ayodhya in North India to Korea. According to the Samguk Yusa, the princess had a dream about a heavenly king who was awaiting heaven's anointed ride. After Princess Heo had the dream, she asked her parents, the king and queen, for permission to set out and seek the man, which the king and queen urged with the belief that god orchestrated the whole fate. Upon approval, she set out on a boat, carrying gold, silver, a tea plant, and a stone which calmed the waters. Archeologists discovered a stone with two fish kissing each other, a symbol of the Gaya kingdom that is unique to the Mishra royal family in Ayodhya, India. This royal link provides further evidence that there was an active commercial engagements between India and Korea since the queen's arrival to Korea.

This almost unbelievable legend had been proven again and again, and Kim Suro wished to have that distant relationship be reconnected again.

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KP Varma, Minister of External Affairs would himself welcome Kim Suro at the Cochin International Airport. Driving down to the Hill Palace in a convoy of SUVs, KP Varma would conduct the Korean representative to the King's Office where the King of Cochin, His Highness Kerala Varma would be standing behind his desk greeting the diplomat. While there is a small and vibrant Korean minority in Cochin, particularly in the Central Asian provinces this would be after a long time that Cochin - Korean diplomacy is happening after the closure of the NAP Cochin signed with the previous Korea.

"Welcome Mr. Suro, I presume this is your first visit to Cochin City?"

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Kim kowtowed deeply on his knees, showing the respect devoted to someone who was on equal status with the Emperor of the Greater Korean Federation.

"Thank you your Majesty for meeting a commoner in person. It is a great honor.

Yes, it is my first time in this part of the world, yet all seems to familiar. Perhaps it is because the founding mother of my family was from the Kingdom of Ayodhya, and the scent of the previous homeland still flows in my blood.

I have come to Cochin in the quest of improving relations with the Kingdom of Cochin. Currently Greater Korea has only two active treaties, those being one with Zargathia and a NAP with Cochin. Given our diplomatic isolation but blooming trade, we feel that the time as come for a step up on our current treaty into something closer."

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[quote name='Kankou' timestamp='1308372380' post='2733655']
Kim kowtowed deeply on his knees, showing the respect devoted to someone who was on equal status with the Emperor of the Greater Korean Federation.

"Thank you your Majesty for meeting a commoner in person. It is a great honor.

Yes, it is my first time in this part of the world, yet all seems to familiar. Perhaps it is because the founding mother of my family was from the Kingdom of Ayodhya, and the scent of the previous homeland still flows in my blood.

I have come to Cochin in the quest of improving relations with the Kingdom of Cochin. Currently Greater Korea has only two active treaties, those being one with Zargathia and a NAP with Cochin. Given our diplomatic isolation but blooming trade, we feel that the time as come for a step up on our current treaty into something closer."
[/quote]

"Korea has certainly come up in the world despite several unfruitful starts. We are certainly glad to see another powerful Asian nation rising up in the world of Global power politics. The NAP which I guess has to be considered transferred to your government is definitely to be updated. We do have to ask you about Korea's current diplomatic standings with United Federation of the East. As you may know since the signing of the earlier NAP considerable rapport and amicability has been established between Cochin and UFE.

Also I must admit I have been unaware of any such connections between the ancient Kingdom of Ayodhya and Korea! I must certainly refer to my uncle, His Royal Highness Rama Varma, the previous King of Cochin, who has a much greater interest in history of ancient kingdoms than me." Kerala Varma replied.

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"Our relations with the UFE can be summarized as being civil. Aside from the small disagreement over territorial waters recently, the UFE considers us a completely different country from before the pre-occupation era, despite the almost complete continuity. It seems their "friendly" people of Japan are on a higher priority list than us, and as such they seem to be inclined to just completely surround us into isolation. Not exactly a situation which seems friendly, in particular since the rather strange annexation of Jeju, which has been Korean for more than a thousand years in a very strange voting act.

At the international scale, Korea can be said to have its enemies. The animosity between us and Dalmatia has never been resolved, and the use of Nordic uranium in the destruction of the Korea-Japan Undersea Tunnel just points to how far those racist Nordics seem to be willing to go in order to destroy us. With the fact that they're deploying a carrier group to the Pacific, we fear that there might be future conflict."

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[quote name='Kankou' timestamp='1308400902' post='2733860']
"Our relations with the UFE can be summarized as being civil. Aside from the small disagreement over territorial waters recently, the UFE considers us a completely different country from before the pre-occupation era, despite the almost complete continuity. It seems their "friendly" people of Japan are on a higher priority list than us, and as such they seem to be inclined to just completely surround us into isolation. Not exactly a situation which seems friendly, in particular since the rather strange annexation of Jeju, which has been Korean for more than a thousand years in a very strange voting act.

At the international scale, Korea can be said to have its enemies. The animosity between us and Dalmatia has never been resolved, and the use of Nordic uranium in the destruction of the Korea-Japan Undersea Tunnel just points to how far those racist Nordics seem to be willing to go in order to destroy us. With the fact that they're deploying a carrier group to the Pacific, we fear that there might be future conflict."
[/quote]

"The Nordics do have a history of extreme instability and excessive force. That being said an alliance between Cochin and Korea does seem proper however we must warn you, our power projection capability towards East, particularly in East Asia is very limited. In a call for defense how much do you think Cochin would be expected to help you?" Kerala Varma asked.

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"It is not the direct hard power of Cochin that would save us, but its soft power. Cochin is the second most connected nation in the world, having a broad alliance stretching the global. It is that very alliance web that would lessen the pressure on us. For example, there are countries to the north and south who might look at us in at least a neutral matter should Cochin be with us, and that would be of most help.

In addition, the geopolitical location of Cochin makes it an ideal ally in countering the attacks of one certain possible enemy we have in mind. That nation would most likely consider its distance from us as the perfect defense, but with Cochin's strong presence, it would be a great deterrent, if not the counter attack force as we defend ourselves"

In short, a full-scale alliance between us would be extremely beneficial to both, since it opens doors to other possibilities that would be helpful to both ourselves and our allies."

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[quote name='Kankou' timestamp='1308459294' post='2734398']
"It is not the direct hard power of Cochin that would save us, but its soft power. Cochin is the second most connected nation in the world, having a broad alliance stretching the global. It is that very alliance web that would lessen the pressure on us. For example, there are countries to the north and south who might look at us in at least a neutral matter should Cochin be with us, and that would be of most help.

In addition, the geopolitical location of Cochin makes it an ideal ally in countering the attacks of one certain possible enemy we have in mind. That nation would most likely consider its distance from us as the perfect defense, but with Cochin's strong presence, it would be a great deterrent, if not the counter attack force as we defend ourselves"

In short, a full-scale alliance between us would be extremely beneficial to both, since it opens doors to other possibilities that would be helpful to both ourselves and our allies."
[/quote]

"Cochin's strategic thinking has always been of peace, safety, security of our citizens being the primary consideration. From what you have been saying an alliance with Korea would serve primarily as a counterblock against another ally of ours, a nation with whom peace and alliance have been achieved after years of hostility and tensions. Cochin's soft power always derives from our willingness to bring our hard power to bear in defense of our allies. If I am reading your concerns right, your biggest antagonist is also a valuable ally of ours. Pending clear cut signals that the said party may also be hostile to us how can we give you assurance of full defense? Plainly speaking, in the absence of any UFE hostility towards Cochin in the near or distant future, and believe me we are always watching, using what rationale should we jeopardize the existing alliance? Mr. Suro, your nation has proposed a monumental diplomatic initiative, so we really need to know where you stand on this before we make a decision that may put lives of our people in risk," Kerala Varma replied.

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"It seems the King's worries are misplaced by my ambiguous wordings. I beg for pardon for confusing the intentions of Korea.

The nation that we are most worried about is Dalmatia. As you have said, that particular regime is infamous for its hypocritical use of force, always acting as the weaker when faced with superior force after being the cause of conflict, and attempting to have complete hegemony over the weaker. You had seen what happened when they used a very suspicious incident to attempt the complete destruction and occupation of Korea, which was only turned back when that regime collapsed under its own contradictions. What Korea fears is that the reborn regime might attempt to accomplish what it had first tried to do.

Since Dalmaita is not particular close to Cochin, we believe that there would be no major conflicts of interest. Aside from the possible attack by the said nation, all we seek is not to fight with any of Cochin's allies, but to accomplish at least a NAP with them. That is why we have asked for Cochin's help, to prevent any conflict with the Nordic nation from expanding uncontrollably.

Does this clear up Korea's thoughts?"

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"Dalmatia is of course a different case entirely. Repeated attempts at engagement with GNED and its predecessors had failed except for a NAP that used to exist with Caucasia, a much more benign forerunner of the present Dalmatia. The callousness of their treatment of the Kazakh people has also brought nothing but distaste to us who have a close affinity with the Kazakh people. That being said Cochin would assist Korea in case of an attack on Korea by Dalmatia, however that cannot be under the aegis of a broadly framed Mutual Defense Pact until Korea resolves its differences with United Federation of the East. Considering the claused nature of our assurance it would be foolhardy to sign any treaty document but we could make concrete physical steps to show that Cochin and Korea stand together on the Dalmatian question. This could be done through a vibrant diplomatic, trade and military engagement between our nations starting with joint military exercises between our armed forces. How would Korea view such an option?"

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"That would be perfect for us. We had been partly shut in by our own logic that treaties are the only methods reliable, but it seems we had forgotten what is the important thing in any relationship: Trust. The only question I would have at the moment is whether the engagement would be formal or informal."

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[quote name='Kankou' timestamp='1308500208' post='2734725']
"That would be perfect for us. We had been partly shut in by our own logic that treaties are the only methods reliable, but it seems we had forgotten what is the important thing in any relationship: Trust. The only question I would have at the moment is whether the engagement would be formal or informal."
[/quote]

The Cochin Korean engagement in all spheres would be definitely formal and in all aspects of a Mutual Defense Pact except without wording it so. We certainly would not be conducting any joint operations in spheres sensitive to UFE but our engagements would be decisive nevertheless in showing our resolve in alliance with Korea. It just would not be codified in any treaty.

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