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Eastern France


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[URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/864/flagg.png/][IMG]http://img864.imageshack.us/img864/1341/flagg.png[/IMG][/URL]

Throughout the former region of Île-de-France, formerly a department of the French joint protectorate between the Germanisk Förbund and the Athenian Federation, and indeed throughout a large portion of eastern France, this flag was rising into the air. The people of Paris, as well as from throughout Île-de-France and Eastern France, were gathering in the city, the former capital of the grand nation of France. A grand celebration was underway, for today would mark the birth of a new, independent nation--a separate country born from the ashes of the previous, fallen, unified France, whose people and territory had been brought under the wings of the Germanisk Förbund and the Athenian Federation. For this guidance and aid in times of distress and trouble, in the wake of the fall of a false, occupationist administration, the people of France were indebted to both nations--but in the territories of Île-de-France, Picardie, Bourgogne, Franche-Comté, and Champagne-Ardenne, the people felt that the time had come that France could no longer remain a protectorate of another nation. The growing sentiment amongst the people was that independence was the only course of action acceptable at this point.

The independence movement was spearheaded by a group of officers and officials, many native French but a few who had arrived here and come to see the nation as their own homeland, formerly employed in the protectorate; these people were instrumental in the movement for independence, as they, having been stationed in the former French territory to administrate and oversee the protectorate in the wake of the previous regime's fall, had the most powerful voice when it came to negotiating with the Germanisk Förbund and the Athenian Federation for eastern France to become a separate, independent entity.

General Julien Jhudiel, formerly a commandant in the French army in the previous administration, who, in the years following the false regime's fall, had worked to aid in the revival of the true French spirit, was the de facto head of this 'Tribunal' of leaders in favour of independence--the collective council that consisted of the seven main leaders of the movement for independence. Seeking justice, safety, freedom, and above all, prosperity, for the French people, it was these seven who had most of all toiled and struggled to gain independence for their homeland, whether they had been born there or had come to consider it a home regardless of their origins.

Finally, the the Germanisk Förbund and the Athenian Federation had, after lengthy discussion and much deliberation, determined that as it was the people's will they would not stand in the way of the rise of an independent eastern France. Even as the announcement was made, that work was being done to prepare eastern France to become an independent nation, the people erupted into celebration. Now, when the efforts of the independence movement were at last coming to true fruition and eastern France was to become the world's newest independent nation, the anticipation and excitement within the people was practically palpable.

Now Julien stood before a vast crowd of cheering citizens, gathered before the Palais Bourbon; arrayed on either side of him were the other six of the Tribunal, all in turn smiling and interacting with the crowd. The duty of speaking to the crowd, words that would capture this moment of triumph, fell to Julien alone, and he would not have exchanged the duty for anything else.

The clock struck noon, and the time had come to speak. Julien stepped forward, and the vast din of the crowd died down, replaced with a silence that was simply brimming with anticipation.

"People of Paris, of Île-de-France, of all the world--lend me your ears for this moment. I wish not to delay the joyous festivities that will fill the streets of Paris and beyond in light of this historic moment of triumph and accomplishment, and I shall not dull your spirits with long-winded speeches and verbosities. Let me say only this. We of Eastern France have long anticipated this moment, the return of a true French nation in the wake of the fall of the false regime. Today this goal has been realised. And when western France feels the time has come to join us we shall welcome them with open arms, and on that day shall be an achievement even greater than that which we stand to commemorate today--a united France, standing proud once more!"

The people cheered, applauded, as Julien stepped back, bowing before them. Up above fireworks burst, showering the grey sky with the colours of the new flag of Eastern France, and across the streets the words of [i]La Marseillaise[/i] could be heard sung by all manner of voices--men and women, children, those of high class backgrounds, those of low status, native-born and otherwise--all a single voice of French patriotism and pride.

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The Franco-German Brigade was also there, and were seen parading through Paris before heading back to Festung Adelheid in the east, their base, to enjoy a break. At least half of France was pacified by now.

The Germanic Union's Althing ratified the legitimacy of the new country and stated that they will of course continue to protect France.

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Like its German comrades the French Guard also had a presence in the region, however shortly after independence becoming official the guard withdrew back to its bases in the still protected France.

"The Athenian Federation confirms independence and welcomes a new independent French state."

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