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BANJARMASIN - Union President Suhadi Kalla announced in a televised speech that a new Constitution had been adopted. Formally known as the [b]National Constitution of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia[/b], the constitution will be based off on the original 1945 Indonesian constitution, with notable changes. The Constitution, which has been simplified for the public's sake, will go as follows:

[font="Courier New"][quote][b][size="3"]Premable[/size][/b]:
The Union of Indonesia and Malaysia has the right to its very existence, nothing else. The Union shall uphold the existence, prosperity, and well-being of the Indonesian and Malay peoples. Every lawful Indonesian-Malaysian citizen has the right to lead his or life whenever he or she sees fit, unless specified otherwise. All lawful citizens are united in honor, pride, joy, grief, rights, blessings, burdens, love, solidarity, peace, and freedom.

[b][size="3"]Article One[/size][/b]:
The Union of Indonesia and Malaysia is an unitary republic consisting of an union between the Indonesian and Malay peoples, based on popular sovereignty.

[b][size="3"]Article Two[/size][/b]:
The Union is to be a democratic, Muslim, and social state. It has the inalienable right to Sovereignty.

[b][size="3"]Article Three[/size][/b]:
Executive power shall be vested in and exercised through the President. The President shall have the right to exercise his or her powers without deference to the Legislature or the Judiciary. The President shall have the right to exercise legislative powers at any time for any reason.

[b][size="3"]Article Four[/size][/b]:
The President shall have the right to form a Cabinet, as well to appoint its Ministers.

[b][size="3"]Article Five[/size][/b]:
The Union of Indonesia and Malaysia shall be divided into provinces, regencies, and localities for the sake of administration.

[size="3"][b]Article Six[/b]:[/size]
Legislative power shall be vested in and exercised through the People's Consultative Assembly, which shall comprise of the People's Representative Council and the Regional Representatives Council, unless stated otherwise.

[size="3"][b]Article Seven[/b]:[/size]
Members of the People's Representative Council shall be elected by general election. The Representative Council shall have the right to pass laws, unless stated otherwise.

[size="3"][b]Article Eight[/b]:[/size]
Members of the Regional Representatives Council shall be apportioned according to population of each province through general election. The Regional Representatives Council shall advise the Representative Council on taxation, education, and religious matters.

[size="3"][b]Article Nine[/b]:[/size]
Judicial power shall be vested and exercised by the Supreme Court to ensure the conformity of the laws passed by the People's Consultative Assembly, unless stated otherwise.

[size="3"][b]Article Ten[/b]:[/size]
The President is the official head of state and government of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia. The President has the power and right to override any laws passed by the People's Consultative Assembly, to dissolve said Assembly, and call for new elections at any time.

[size="3"][b]Article Eleven[/b]:[/size]
The right to the free exercise of religion, of speech, of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances shall be respected, unless stated otherwise.

[size="3"][b]Article Twelve[/b]:[/size]
Every lawful citizen of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia over the age of eighteen, with sound mental standing, shall have the right to bear arms, unless stated otherwise.

[size="3"][b]Article Thirteen[/b]:[/size]
Soldiers will not be quartered in any private house in peacetime or wartime, without the express consent of the owner, unless stated otherwise.

[size="3"][b]Article Fourteen[/b]:[/size]
The people shall be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures, unless stated otherwise.

[size="3"][b]Article Fifteen[/b]:[/size]
No lawful citizens shall be held to answer for any crime, except in cases concerning the military, national security, and war. They cannot be persecuted twice, and shall not be deprived of life, liberty, or property, unless stated otherwise.

[size="3"][b]Article Sixteen[/b]:[/size]
In trial, the accused shall have the right to a speedy and public trial, unless stated otherwise.

[size="3"][b]Article Seventeen[/b]: [/size]
The right to trial by jury shall be respected, unless stated otherwise.

[size="3"][b]Article Eighteen[/b]:[/size]
There shall be no excessive bail, excessive fine, cruel and unusual punishment, and the thereforth, unless stated otherwise.

[size="3"][b]Article Nineteen[/b]:[/size]
All lawful citizens of and over eighteen years of age have the right to vote in any public election, unless stated otherwise.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty[/b]:[/size]
All lawful citizens are equal before the law in language, race, color, opinion, belief, and religion, along with others. They shall have equal rights, and the Union and State shall uphold such rights, unless stated otherwise.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-One[/b]:[/size]
The Union of Indonesia and Malaysia professes belief in God, but the right of freedom of religion shall be guaranteed and safeguarded to all lawful citizens.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Two[/b]:[/size]
All lawful citizens shall have the right to education of high quality.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Three[/b]:[/size]
The armed forces of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia, to be referred to as the Indonesian-Malaysian Armed Forces (IM-AF or IMAF), are under the final and ultimate authority, control, and command of the President.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Four[/b]:[/size]
All lawful citizens have the right and obligations to participate in the defense of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Five[/b]:[/size]
The Indonesian-Malaysian Armed Forces and the Indonesian-Malaysian National Police shall be accorded appropriate powers in peacetime and wartime.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Six[/b]:[/size]
This Constitution may be changed and/or amended by a two-thirds of the People's Consultative Assembly, or at the decision of the President.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Seven[/b]:[/size]
All major means of production shall be controlled, or otherwise regulated, by the state.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Eight[/b]:[/size]
All provisions within this Constitution shall be binding through executive, legislative, and judicial institutions, unless stated otherwise.[/quote][/font]
Furthermore, the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia shall follow the ideals of [b]Pancasila[/b], which are as below:

[quote][font="Courier New"]1. Belief in one and only God
2. Just and civilized humanity
3. The unity of Indonesia and Malaysia
4. Democracy guided by the inner wisdom of the Indonesian and Malaysian peoples
5. Social justice for all of the people of Indonesia and Malaysia[/font][/quote]

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BANJARMASIN - The People's Consultative Assembly, on its first field test, passed the [b]Government Administration Law[/b], which established, if not de facto then de jure, administrative divisions in the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia. In the Indonesian part of the island, four Provinces were created (with capital city denoted in parentheses):

[quote]South Kalimantan (Banjarmasin)
Central Kalimantan (Palangkaraya)
West Kalimantan (Pontianak)
East Kalimantan (Samarinda)[/quote]
In the Malaysian side, three Provinces were established:

[quote]Sarawak (Kuching)
Sabah (Kota Kinabalu)
Brunei (Bandar Seri Begawan)[/quote]
This was done in accordance to Article Five of the new Constitution, and it had been confirmed that regional and local governments across the Union are currently hard at work implementing the Law.

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KUALA LUMPUR - Several weeks following the conclusion of a treaty between the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia and the United Federation of the East, and especially the take-over of peninsular Malaysia (with the exception of Singapore), the People's Consultative Assembly voted to formally incorporate the new region, including what is known as Southern Thailand, into the Union.

By this, Kuala Lumpur, the historic Malay capital, effectively became the largest city in the Union, beating out the capital, Banjarmasin, in terms of population.

===

BANJARMASIN - In accordance to the incorporation of peninsular Malaysia and Southern Thailand, the Government Administration Law was extended to the new territories. New provinces were established in peninsular Malaysia, such as:

[quote]Kuala Lumpur (Kuala Lumpur)
Johor (Johor Bahru)
Kedah (Alor Setar)
Kelantan (Kota Bharu)
Malacca (Malacca City)
Negeri Sembilan (Seremban)
Pahang (Kuantan)
Penang (George Town)
Perak (Ipoh)
Perlis (Kangar)
Selangor (Shahalam)
Terengganu (Kuala Terengganu)
Putrajaya (Putrajaya)[/quote]
In Southern Thailand, the following were established:

[quote]Chumphon (Chumphon)
Songkhla (Haiyai)
Krabi (Krabi)
Nakhon Si Thammarat (Nakhon Si Thammarat)
Pattani (Pattani City)
Phang Nga (Phang Nga)
Phattlhalung (Halung City)
Phuket (Phuket)
Ranong (Ranong City)
Satun (Sa City)
Surat Thani (Surat Thani)
Trang (Trang)
Yala (Yala City)[/quote]
All UFE laws not conflicting with the Constitution would be retained, although modified to Indonesian-Malaysian standards. All facets of the Indonesian-Malaysian system (such as local and provincial government ministries, judicial system, etc.) were currently being implemented in place.

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[b]CLASSIFIED[/b]

In a report to Union President, Suhadi Kalla, and the Defense Ministry, Army Chief of Staff George Toisutta reported the successes of recruitment efforts across the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia. So far, according to the general, the Indonesian-Malaysian Army has over 300,000 troops serving under arms, of which most are in training camps across the nation, including peninsular Malaysia. The Army National Recruitment Office, Toisutta continued, has plans to form a reserve force which will contain a further 200,000 troops, bringing the total number of the Army to 500,000 troops. In addition, "hundreds and thousands of military vehicles", including armored vehicles and artillery pieces, have been either already built or are currently under construction.

Regarding the Air Force, Toisutta stated the Air Force is planned to have approximately 70 squadrons, of which a squadron will compose 12 aircrafts each. The Air Force is projected to consist of approximately 840 aircrafts total, and will include fighters, bombers, strike-fighters, and reconnaissance aircrafts, as well as AWACs, EWACs, transport aircrafts, and cargo aircrafts. As for the Navy, the Chief of Staff stated he had contacted the United Federation of the East regarding that, but he acknowledged the Union has at least a functioning brown-water Navy, of which to defend its shores.

In turn, the Chief of Staff stated the reformation of the [i]Komando Pasukan Khusus[/i] ([b]Kopassus[/b], or the '[b]Special Forces Command[/b]'). The Kopassus will serve as a special forces of the Indonesian-Malaysian Armed Forces responsible for special operations as ordered by the government such as unconventional warfare, sabotage, counter-insurgency, counter-terrorism, intelligence gethering, direct action, and other aspects like these. The Kopassus will have approximately 40,000 troops under its command, and will be led by a Commandant General ([i]DanJen[/i]), who holds a rank equivalent to Major General.

Lastly, Touisutta stated the Armed Forces is in the process of constructing a 10 megaton nuclear bomb, of which it plans to test in an underground location once completed. The total number of nuclear weapons to be constructed remains undetermined, to be up to the President's decision.

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[b]CLASSIFIED[/b]

Union President Suhadi Kalla issued a resolution to all appropriate officials of the Ministry of the Interior, all three branches of the Armed Forces, the National Police, and Members of the People's Consultative Assembly.

In this, he set forth objectives to be implemented in place immediately. Although the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia was in no danger of invasion, and it was in a perfect strategic place in the world (it was 'bordered' by the UFE and Minilla Island; any invading forces would have to take that into account), Kalla knew it did not hurt to have some security precautions in place.

Firstly, he designated Kuala Lumpur as the 'secondary' capital (that is, a backup capital) should Banjarmasin fall to foreign invasion or get destroyed by a nuclear attack. In this, he ordered all government ministries to establish 'backup' branches in Kuala Lumpur. That way, if the Union government was destroyed in one fell swoop, there would be a backup government centered in Kuala Lumpur to assume the reins of government. In this, he ordered the Army Corps of Engineers to construct underground nuclear shelters to the "highest standards" across the nation.

Secondly, he ordered krakatoa mines to be placed on the beaches and shores of the Union's major ports: all approaches to Kuching, Banjarmasin, Kota Balikpapan, Kota Tarakan, Sandakan, Kota Kinabalu, Bandar Sen Begawan, Bintulu, Kota Singkawang, and Ketapang on the island of Borneo was to be "filled with mines, to be activated manually." The mines were to pack a powerful charge, and was to be calibrated so the beaches would be safe for public use. In peninsular Malaysia and southern Thailand, the same orders were issued for the ports of Kuantan, Alor Setar, Klang, Pulau Pinang, Malacca City, Phuket, along with many others.

Thirdly and lastly, he ordered all port authorities to assume "broadened powers" to ensure the safety and security of people, resources, and equipment entering and leaving Union ports. This include the right to inspect foreign vessels, be it civilian or military, within 12 nautical miles of the Union's shores; the Union's allies and treaty partners would be exempt from this. The same would go for customs officials, especially at airports.

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BANJARMASIN - At Union President Suhadi Kalla's initiative, the People's Consultative Assembly approved the passage of several acts further refining the Union's administrative system. The Government Administration Law was amended to include the formation of a new administrative unit: [b]Regions[/b]. In Borneo, four Regions were established:

[quote]Kalimantan Region (West Kalimantan, East Kalimantan, and Central Kalimantan Provinces)
Sarawak Region (Sarawak Province)
Sabah Region (Sabah Province)
Brunei Region (part of Sarawak Province)[/quote]
Not only that, but a [b]National Capital Territory (NCT)[/b] was officially established in the South Kalimantan region, where the Union capital, Banjarmasin, will serve as the administrative seat. A National Capital Assembly will be formed, and will have full control and sovereignity over the NCT, but not over the entire Union.

In peninsular Malaysia, three Regions were formed as well:

[quote]West Malaysia Region (peninsular Malaysia, with the exception of the Malacca Province)
Malacca Region (Malacca Province)
Patani Region (southern Thailand)[/quote]
To elaborate further, the Regions will have powers and jurisdiction over Provinces within their boundaries, but will report to the National Capital Territory, and in turn, to the Union government, as with the provinces. Furthermore, the Provinces will be sub-divided into administrative [b]Districts[/b] for the general purposes of local governance. The Districts will report to the Provinces.

[center][img]http://i.imgur.com/twlRU.png[/img][/center]
Red is the National Capital Territory, Blue is Kalimantan Region, Yellow is Sarawak Region, Light purple is Brunei Region, Orange is Sabah Region, Brown is West Malaysia Region, Darker purple is Malacca Region, and turquoise is Patani Region.

In addition, two 'Cultural Regions' were formed, which would confirm the status of Indonesia and Malaysia within the Union. The Cultural Regions, which has no formal powers and does not affect the Regions as well as the Provinces and the newly-formed Districts), would also serve as [b]Census Regions[/b] for census purposes. They encomprasses the historic borders of Indonesia and Malaysia.

[center]===[/center]
BANJARMASIN - The National Flag Commission, after weeks of deliberations, presented the final design of the new [b]Flag of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia[/b]. The design underwent review, and was ultimately approved by Union President Kalla himself. The flag thus became the official Flag of the Union, and will be flown across the country.

[center][img]http://i.imgur.com/Du2WZ.png[/img][/center]
The Flag of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia has been designed to incorporate certain elements of both the Indonesian and Malaysian flags, but will retain an uniqueness in its design in part. It has a broad red bar running down the center, with the name of Allah written in the Arabic alphabet, which emphasizes the fact the Union is a predominately Muslim state.

Not only that, but there are four smaller bars running alongside the broad bar, two green and two white. Along with four stars above and below Allah's name, the bars represents the eight newly-established Regions (known as Union Regions), including the NCT.

Lastly, the colors reflect Islam in the fact that the red color in the broad bar symbolizes courage, while the white color stands for purity and green for faith.

Edited by JEDCJT
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BANJARMASIN - The People's Consultative Assembly passed what was formally called the [b]National Banking Law[/b]. By this, the Law established (or more like, re-established) Bank Indonesia, which had served as the central bank of the first Indonesia. The bank, now-named [b]Bank Indonesia-Malaysia[/b], will be headed by a Board of Governors comprising of a Bank governor, a senior deputy governor, and four junior deputy governors. The Union President has the power to appoint as well dismiss any member of the Board of Governors with or without approval from the People's Consultative Assembly, and all members of the Board will serve a five-year term, unless they resign, are removed, or are incapable of serving, and would be allowed to serve two terms total.

The Law mandated for the establishment of a major Bank branch in each Region of the Union, which amounts to eight branch organizations altogether. In turn, each branch organization will oversee a network of smaller branches in their areas of jurisdiction. In addition, it designated the Board of Governors as the highest banking body, with considerable power and discretion over monetary policy as well as policy implementation and enforcement. The Bank would assume responsibility, control, and jurisdiction over money-printing and minting policies; all mints were to be placed under the Bank's control.

The objectives of Bank Indonesia-Malaysia will be, in the words of President Kalla, to:

Maintain and ensure monetary stability, as well the financial sustainability of the Bank Indonesia-Malaysia and its branch organizations; to strengthen the effectiveness of monetary management; to create a sound and effective banking and financial system; to maintain the security and effectiveness of the payment system; promote good governance; strengthen the Bank and its organizations, and build a highly-competant human resources management system; and to promote the financial and monetary interests of the Union as a whole.

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BANJARMASIN - Union President Suhadi Kalla announced to the world the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia was now a nuclear-capable nation. In a speech broadcast in Banjarmasin, the President stated that the nuclear weapon was conducted at an underground location somewhere in the island of Borneo (also known as Kalimantan) - he did not specify exactly where it was - and that it was a "high success." The Union of Indonesia and Malaysia, through this achievement, had enhanced its defenses and power - although Kalla expressed hopes that it "would never be used."

The President did not state exactly how many nuclear weapons the Union would procure for its new nuclear stockpile; later in the day, Army Chief of Staff George Toisutta elaborated that the amount of nukes would be at least "ten weapons" or more.

===

[b]CLASSIFIED[/b]

Army Chief of Staff Toisutta, in addition to publicly stating the planned number of nuclear weapons the Union planned to possess, indicated in a classified report to President Kalla that efforts to expand the Indonesian-Malaysian Armed Forces had been a success so far. The Army National Recruitment Office had recently suspended recruitment efforts due to high degree of recruitment. The Army Reserve now holds approximately 200,000 troops; the Indonesian-Malaysian Army currently has 500,000 troops, all armed with high-powered weaponry produced by the expanding military-industrial complex. In addition, thousands of tanks, military vehicles, self-propelled howitzers, and artillery batteries had been produced and are in the process of integration into the Armed Forces. Furthermore, millions - if not billions - of ammunition for a wide range of weapons had been produced and stored in secure locations across the country.

Not only that, but the Kopassus had been successfully reformed, and is in full operation, with operating bases being established all over the country. Banjar Malik had been appointed Commandant General (DanJen).

Next, the Indonesian-Malaysian Air Force, according to Toisutta, was well under construction: about ten squadrons of fighters and interceptors had been built so far, and are being fitted in airbases around the country; the same went for three squadrons of bombers, as well squadrons of EWAC and AWAC aircrafts, reconnaissance aircrafts, and military transport aircrafts. No update was given as of yet for the Indonesian-Malaysian Navy.

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[b]CLASSIFIED[/b]

In accordance to the Union President's earlier resolution, the Ministry of Defense sanctioned, with President Kalla's explicit approval via a secure connection, the formation of what had been called the [b]Supreme Council of the Armed Forces[/b] (full name: [i]Supreme National Council of the Indonesian-Malaysian Armed Forces[/i]).

The Supreme Council is to consist, in addition to the Union President serving as chairman, of the Minister of Defense, the Army Chief of Staff, Commander of the Armed Forces, senior officials and personnel of the Army, Navy, and Air Force (such as Generals, Admirals, and Marshals), as well as other important military officials. The expressed purpose of the Supreme Council is to serve as a central coordinating body, as well a command structure, of the Armed Forces during peacetime and wartime, as well as times of emergency and the like.

In addition, a 'backup' branch of the Supreme Council was established in Kuala Lumpur, as to enable the Supreme Council to function after a nuclear attack, or widespread destruction, of Banjarmasin, the national capital. Finally, the military was given a role in the Union's political system as about three percent of seats in both houses of the People's Consultative Assembly were reserved for military officers (except the Supreme Commander and the Army Chief of Staff). The terms for the military officers in both houses of the Assembly was limited to two-year terms, for up to one term total. This was a way of giving the military a role in preservation of the Union, its structure and institutions, and values.

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BANJARMASIN - A spokesman of the soon-to-be-renamed People's Consultative Assembly announced the modification of the National Constitution of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia, which had been initated by popular demand and approved by the Assembly with popular support (and President Kalla too). The amended Constitution went as follows:

[font="Courier New"][quote][b][size="3"]Premable[/size][/b]:
The Union of Indonesia and Malaysia has the right to its very existence, nothing else. The Union shall uphold the existence, prosperity, and well-being of the the Malay peoples, specifically Indonesians and Malaysians, among with other minorities not mentioned thereforth. Every lawful Indonesian-Malaysian citizen has the right to lead his or life whenever he or she sees fit, unless specified otherwise. All lawful citizens are united in honor, pride, joy, grief, rights, blessings, burdens, love, solidarity, peace, and freedom.

[b][size="3"]Article One[/size][/b]:
The Union of Indonesia and Malaysia is to be a federated republic consisting of an union among the Malay peoples.

[b][size="3"]Article Two[/size][/b]:
The Union is to be a democratic, Muslim, and social state. It has the inalienable right to Sovereignty.

[b][size="3"]Article Three[/size][/b]:
Executive power shall be vested in and exercised through the respective offices of the President and the Prime Minister. The President shall be the official head of state of the Union, and the Prime Minister the official head of government of the Union.

[b][size="3"]Article Four[/size][/b]:
The Union President shall have the right to exercise his or her powers without deference to the Legislature or the Judiciary, under certain circumstances. The President shall have the right to exercise legislative powers with the explicit consent of the National Assembly, and he or she shall have the right to override any laws passed by the National Assembly, to dissolve said Assembly, and call for new elections under certain circumstances. The President shall have the right to appoint and dismiss any members of the Cabinet upon the proposal of the Prime Minister. The President shall have the right to appoint and dismiss any members of the Supreme Court, the High Court of Appeals, and lower courts with the approval of the National Assembly. The President shall have appropriate powers and responsibilities regarding foreign affairs, which includes but not limited to ratifying and promulgating treaties and agreements. The President shall have the right to proclaim martial law, or any State emergency, and to issue executive orders, which shall have the force of Law. The President shall chair and represent the Supreme National Council of the Indonesian-Malaysian Armed Forces, and shall have the right to appoint, as well dismiss, the Army Chief of Staff, Commander of the Armed Forces, and other officials and personnel of the Armed Forces of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia.

[b][size="3"]Article Five[/size][/b]:
The Prime Minister, as official head of government, shall head the National Assembly. The Prime Minister has the right to form a Cabinet; he or she also has the right to propose, but not carry out, any appointment of his or her Cabinet. The Prime Minister has the power and right to issue directives, as long as they do not conflict with the Constitution, any laws or resolutions issued by the National Assembly, or any executive orders issued by the President. The Prime Minister is appointed, as well dismissed, by the President with a 2/3+1 majority of support in the National Assembly.

[size="3"][b]Article Six[/b]:[/size]
The Union of Indonesia and Malaysia shall be divided into provinces, regencies, and localities for the sake of administration.

[size="3"][b]Article Seven[/b]:[/size]
Legislative power shall be vested in and exercised through the National Assembly of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia, which shall comprise of the House of Representatives and the Senate.

[size="3"][b]Article Eight[/b]:[/size]
Members of the House of Representatives shall be elected by general election. The House of Representatives shall have the right to pass laws.

[size="3"][b]Article Nine[/b]:[/size]
Members of the Senate shall be apportioned according to population of each province through general election. The Senate shall advise the House of Representatives on taxation, education, and religious matters.

[size="3"][b]Article Ten[/b]:[/size]
Judicial power shall be vested and exercised by the Supreme Court to provide a form of oversight over the overall Judicial system, specifically Courts of Appeals and Trial Courts. The Supreme Court shall be independent of the Executive and Legislature, except under certain circumstances, and shall serve as a final court of appeals in the overall justice system. It shall have the power and authority to examine and evaluate court cases passed on by the lower courts, including past ones if sufficient evidence are found.

[size="3"][b]Article Eleven[/b]:[/size]
The Constitutional Court shall have the power to ensure the conformity of the laws passed by the National Assembly. The Constitutional Court, which shall have jurisdiction separate from that of the Supreme Court, shall also have the power to resolve disputes regarding constitutional competence between State institutions on all levels, to settle disputes on electoral results, to sanction the formation of and/or dissolution of political parties with the approval of the National Assembly and ratification of the National Assembly, and to impeach the President, Prime Minister, and/or any government officials on all levels.

[size="3"][b]Article Twelve[/b]:[/size]
The right to the free exercise of religion, of speech, of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances shall be respected, unless stated otherwise.

[size="3"][b]Article Thirteen[/b]:[/size]
Every lawful citizen of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia over the age of eighteen, with sound mental standing, shall have the right to bear arms.

[size="3"][b]Article Fourteen[/b]:[/size]
Soldiers will not be quartered in any private house in peacetime or wartime, without the express consent of the owner.

[size="3"][b]Article Fifteen[/b]:[/size]
The people shall be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures.

[size="3"][b]Article Sixteen[/b]:[/size]
No lawful citizens shall be held to answer for any crime, except in cases concerning the military, national security, and war. They cannot be persecuted twice, and shall not be deprived of life, liberty, or property.

[size="3"][b]Article Seventeen[/b]:[/size]
In trial, the accused shall have the right to a speedy and public trial.

[size="3"][b]Article Eighteen[/b]: [/size]
The right to trial by jury shall be respected.

[size="3"][b]Article Nineteen[/b]:[/size]
There shall be no excessive bail, excessive fine, cruel and unusual punishment, and the thereforth.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty[/b]:[/size]
All lawful citizens of and over eighteen years of age have the right to vote in any public election.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-One[/b]:[/size]
All lawful citizens are equal before the law in language, race, color, opinion, belief, and religion, along with others. They shall have equal rights, and the Union and State shall uphold such rights.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Two[/b]:[/size]
The Union of Indonesia and Malaysia professes belief in God, but the right of freedom of religion shall be guaranteed and safeguarded to all lawful citizens.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Three[/b]:[/size]
All lawful citizens shall have the right to education of high quality.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Four[/b]:[/size]
The Flag of the Union of Indonesia shall corporate certain elements of both the Indonesian and Malaysian flags, but shall retain the uniqueness in its design as to maintain the uniqueness of the Union as a state. It has a broad red bar running down the center, with the name of Allah written in the Arabic alphabet, which emphasizes the Union as a predominately Muslim state. Furthermore, there are four smaller bars running alongside the broad red bar on both sides, four green and four white. Along with four stars above and below Allah's name, the bars represents the eight Regions (known as Union Regions) that form the Union, including the National Capital Territory (NCT). The colors reflect Islam in the fact that the red color in the broad bar symbolizes courage, while the white color stands for purity and green for faith.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Five[/b]:[/size]
The armed forces of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia, to be referred to as the Indonesian-Malaysian Armed Forces (IM-AF or IMAF), are under the final and ultimate authority, control, and command of the President.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Six[/b]:[/size]
All lawful citizens have the right and obligations to participate in the defense of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Seven[/b]:[/size]
The Indonesian-Malaysian Armed Forces and the Indonesian-Malaysian National Police shall be accorded appropriate powers in peacetime and wartime.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Eight[/b]:[/size]
This Constitution may be changed and/or amended by a two-thirds of the National Assembly, or at the decision of the President.

[size="3"][b]Article Twenty-Nine[/b]:[/size]
All major means of production shall be controlled, or otherwise regulated, by the state.

[size="3"][b]Article Thirty[/b]:[/size]
All provisions within this Constitution shall be binding through executive, legislative, and judicial institutions.[/quote][/font]

Edited by JEDCJT
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NEW JAKARTA (formerly Banjarmasin) - The National Assembly voted to rename the capital to [b]New Jakarta[/b]. This move received considerable public and political support, and as such the Assembly also passed a resolution ([i]Resolution Concerning the Status of the New Capital Name[/i]) ordering all government institutions throughout the country to adopt the new name in official communiques. Foreign embassies were informed of this, and told to adopt the new name when referring to the capital. In accordance to the resolution, the Pos Indonesia-Malaysia, the Union's national postal service, were ordered not to put through any letters, documents, or packages that used the old name.

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NEW JAKARTA - A spokesman of the National Assembly stated that a new Prime Minister was appointed by Union President Suhadi Kalla and approved by the National Assembly by the required two-thirds vote. Najib Razak, thus, became the first Prime Minister of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia, and his appointment received near-universal support all over the nation. The fact that an Indonesian president and Malaysian prime minister served to reflect the union and harmony between the Indonesian and Malaysian peoples in an Union dedicated to them.

"I promise, to the best of my ability and skill, to carry out the duties and commitments in this post of Prime Minister, and I will do my utmost best to carry out, and promote and safeguard, the interests of the Malay people and the Union as a whole." Razak stated in his inauguration speech in New Jakarta. He vowed to work together with Union President in accomplishing such goals.

Edited by JEDCJT
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[b]CLASSIFIED[/b]

In a secure report to Union President Suhadi Kalla, Army Chief of Staff George Toisutta stated that ten 10-megaton nuclear weapons had been constructed and stored in underground nuclear silos located across the country. He stated that, due to the recent nuclear attacks in North America and all over the world, construction of the underground nuclear shelters were accelerated. Additional funding and resources would be channeled in such a endeavor, he said.

Toisutta went on to state that construction of biological and chemical weapons had started in top-secret government laboratories located in Kalimantan and peninsular Malaysia. Like nuclear weapons, biological and chemical weapons (to be outfitted into a hypersonic missile) were to be used as a last resort, to be launched when all viable options for the Union had been exhausted. A wide variety of bacterial agents - viruses, bacteria, fungi, and biological toxins - are in the process of being produced and stored in secret laboratories. This includes but not limited to ebola, ricin, yellow fever virus, Marburg virus, to name a few. The growing biological weapons program in the Union, under the aegis of the Military Research and Development Bureau of the Ministry of Defense, were designed to not only deal devastating effects upon enemy targets (personnel), but also the target nation's means of production (such as agriculture and the like).

In turn, the chemical weapons program, also under the aegis of the [b]Military Research and Development Bureau (MRDB)[/b], were to include a wide variety of devastating chemicals known to humankind, including but not limited to nerve agents, blood agents, blister agents, and cytotoxin agents. Such agents include but are not limited to sarin, arsine, sulfur mustard, ricin, and abrin. Such chemical agents are being developed and stored in top-secret research laboratories (in separate wards, away from the biological sectors). To ensure maximum effect, Toisutta continued, the biological and chemical agents were to be stored in high-concentration droplets up to 1 mm. This would help to ensure heavy contimination of the target area(s).

Next, the Army Chief of Staff outlined a plan to construct an air-defense system in the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia. The plan, titled [i]A Comprehensive Plan Regarding Air Defense of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia[/i], went as follows:

In regards to the aerial defenses of the Union, hundreds of anti-aircraft and surface-to-air missile sites will be built in strategic areas all over the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia, particularly major urban installations. Anti-aircraft and SAM sites will be arrayed around major cities, towns, and in some instance, villages – as well as strategic areas. To attain the objective of enforcing and safeguarding air-defense, and to protect Union airspace from domination and attack by hostile powers, missile defense systems will be utilized for this specific purpose. Under the supervision of the [b]Missile Defense Command (MDC)[/b], a bureau of the Ministry of Defense, various missile systems will be utilized to ensure national defense. They are as follows (in no particular order), although not limited to:

[quote][b]PATRIOT Advanced Capability-3 (PAC-3) missile:[/b]
The PATRIOT Advanced Capability-3, known as the PAC-3, missile is a mobile, high-velocity, shoot-to kill interceptor missile developed to improve defense capabilities by shooting down cruise missiles and aircraft. To achieve this, the PAC-3 missile will collide with the target mid-air at extremely high (if not supersonic) speeds to destroy and target and neutralize its payload. It will play a large part in the air-defense capabilities of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia.

[b]Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense (THAAD):[/b]
The Terminal High-Altitude Area Defense (known as THAAD) is an interceptor missile designed to intercept and destroy cruise missiles within (or just outside) the planet’s atmosphere. THAAD shall be utilized in several components, such as motorized launchers, interceptors, radar, and communications.[/quote]
But this is not all; the Air Force will also play a crucial role in air-defense. According to the Ministry of the Air Force, squadrons of fighters and interceptors (whenever available) will be configured to scramble into the air at a moment’s notice, utilizing their strategic bases and planning to attain control of Union airspace. To ensure optimistic performance, coordination, and communication, hundreds of radar installations will be established in strategic areas all over the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia. They will watch the skies and report on anything happening, thus enabling the Air Force, and the rest of the Armed Forces, to chart an appropriate response.

In addition, Toisutta turned to sea defense. The Ministry of Defense had mandated that a deployment sea-defense system was crucial to the defense of the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia. Given the Union's relatively lack of a Navy, such a proposition was viable. It would be deployed when needed and can be upgraded at any time.

The [b]Integrated Undersea Surveillance System (IUSS)[/b] will utilize fixed, mobile, and deployable acoustic arrays that will provide the Navy with a means of detecting both diesel and nuclear submarines. Work stations, enhanced signal processing, and communication technology will enable the Navy to utilize remote array monitoring, which would reduce manpower costs and improve efficiency. The IUSS will utilize a mix of sea-based launchers that can be placed on the ocean floor and used to launch mines and torpedoes. In addition, features in the ocean floor can be used to house underwater bunkers that can be armed with torpedoes and the like. Because they are situated on the ocean floor, they are virtually undetectable to enemy and foreign sonar, providing the Union of Indonesia and Malaysia an advantage into monitoring any activity in the Java Sea, South China Sea, Sulu Sea, and Celebes Sea, as well the Makassar Strait, the Karimata Strait, and the Strait of Malacca.

Futhermore, the undersea components and arrays will be placed on the seafloor along the Union's Kalimantan and peninsular Malaysian coasts. They will be configured in a way that they can be deployed and upgraded at a moment’s notice, as well as enable the Navy to compile a comprehensible database pertaining to submarines and other aspects.

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