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Star Wars Prequels

Captain Marin

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Ever since the year 1969, George Lucas has created a legion of followers that has forever hailed the name and the universe of Star Wars. From a trilogy of cinema, to conventions, to a franchise of books, Star Wars has proven itself time and time again that its universe shall never be plagued nor will it be diminished by the corporate menace or the single nightmare of writing. That is up until Star Wars has blasted its highly anticipated comeback, but it was not strong enough to have the crowd reminisce and remind what made Star Wars such a great franchise. George Lucas has then returned with Attack of the Clones, which everything was present what made a film great but not what made Star Wars such an epic phenomenon. Fanboys became enraged. Geeks have arisen a revolution against the Godfather of Sci-Fi, many have doubted Star Wars' existence. That is, up until 2005.

George Lucas became aware that he is destroying the single universe he has created. He, too, became enraged against the fanboys but has acknowledged the fact that he is doing this for the sole satisfactory of those he has gained the hearts; he needed to gain those hearts in return for the sake of Star Wars' existence and so he became aware that Episode III was his only chance to do so. Furiously, George Lucas began production for Star Wars: Episode III. Expecting this film to be a great disappointment by wooden acting, excessive use of CGI, and a mediocre script, George has stricken back with such a vengeance. Episode III did not fulfill the same spirit the Original Trilogy has acclaimed, but it has created its own. Starting with battle scene, demise of Count Dooku, the chase against General Grievous; the plot has escalated in such an epic middle and climax.

Every Lightsaber Battle was fantastic, Natalie Portman and Hayden Christensen's acting drastically improved, the use of CGI was better moderated, combat scenes were epic, but the reason why Star Wars Episode III was such a success critically was not because of the birth of Darth Vader, but the inner most depth and emotion of the film accompanied with a fantastic score by John Williams. The Great Jedi Purge, the birth of a new Empire, the great revealing, the death of Democracy, Padme, and Anakin Skywalker, the genuine rise of power of Darth Sidious, and the lightsaber battles between Lord Vader and Obi-Wan Kenobi, all of those objectives were the reasons why Star Wars III was such a success.

Back during the childish days of the 7th Grade, before the !@#$%bags at Time Warner cut off my families' illegal cable, I was roaming throughout the pixels of television up until I have stumbled upon a Star Wars movie during May 4 in the Spike Television Network. That Star Wars movie was Revenge of the Sith. Without knowledge of the Star Wars Universe, I have decided to watch it and see what is so great about Star Wars. The movie gave me goosebumps. The battle between Obi-Wan and Vader had me in thrill and suspense. The battle between Yoda and Sidious gave me curiosity about the Star Wars Universe. The Jedi Purge gripped my soul with emotion. I had sympathy for Anakin when he turned to the dark side because I know how it feels like to be ignored and be remained unimportant. This week, I have viewed the prequels (for the 4th or 5th time) and I still feel that same feeling I felt when I first watched Episode III.

Personally, I believe that Episode III reigns superior from the rest of the movies of Star Wars not because of its CGI, but because Episode III has inserted the one feeling the rest of the films did not do: emotion. A movie dark-toned both technically and story-wise catches my attention more than a good one. A movie with great action and beautiful battles with modern effects, passion, and emotion grabs my attention more than a combat scene with a short lightsaber duel and a cheesy battle with custom effects. It is not because I have angst towards the Original Trilogy, it is because Episode III has concluded with such a dark and memorable plot and cinematography. Overall, all three of the Original Trilogy remains excellent, Episode I remains mediocre and Episode II remains good, but Episode III is my most favorable Star Wars (and/or maybe Sci-Fi) film I have ever watched. As I have a right to have my personal opinion, as do you too.

May the Force be with you all.



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Well, first for a movie which was dedicated to the character development of Anakin (presumably? it's hard to really see a clear theme in the movie), this was all done incredibly poorly.

The original trilogy was about the characters and their development. The audience feels connected to the characters and has a reason to care about them. The action supports this, it supports their development, and the reason I care about the movies is the story/characters.

How many people have you heard say that any of the prequels are wonderful because of the character depth (lol) or story? Your entire support is about individual components which were in effect the only value of the movies. There was minimal (at best) character development, the dialogue/story was boring as hell, and the only reason the movies can be considered worth watching is the action scenes and/or CGI.

You see a whiney kid go through... exactly the path you expect him to go, becoming evil. Go figure, this isn't suspenseful or dramatic at all. I don't care when Anakin becomes Vader because he is never shown to have redeeming qualities whatsoever. There's no internal battle, I'm never given a "why should I care" answer about Anakin.

None of the characters in any of the prequel have any depth whatsoever, which makes sense because they were pawns in the "oooh CGI is cool, I'm gonna use as much of it as possible!" production style.

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Well, first for a movie which was dedicated to the character development of Anakin (presumably? it's hard to really see a clear theme in the movie), this was all done incredibly poorly.

The original trilogy was about the characters and their development. The audience feels connected to the characters and has a reason to care about them. The action supports this, it supports their development, and the reason I care about the movies is the story/characters.

How many people have you heard say that any of the prequels are wonderful because of the character depth (lol) or story? Your entire support is about individual components which were in effect the only value of the movies. There was minimal (at best) character development, the dialogue/story was boring as hell, and the only reason the movies can be considered worth watching is the action scenes and/or CGI.

You see a whiney kid go through... exactly the path you expect him to go, becoming evil. Go figure, this isn't suspenseful or dramatic at all. I don't care when Anakin becomes Vader because he is never shown to have redeeming qualities whatsoever. There's no internal battle, I'm never given a "why should I care" answer about Anakin.

None of the characters in any of the prequel have any depth whatsoever, which makes sense because they were pawns in the "oooh CGI is cool, I'm gonna use as much of it as possible!" production style.

Connection is one of the reasons why I felt sympathy for Anakin instead of agony and pleading against the antagonist; the poor guy is being forced to choose between love and accomplishment. Anakin was an outcast from the Jedi Council and was not liked upon them neither (besides Obi-Wan). Palpatine is basically the only person (besides Padme) that has recognized Anakin's skills and complimented along with them. Which side would you rather pick, the pure side where love and fatherhood is prohibited, or the evil side that allows you to peacefully cherish moments with your wife along with comfortably raising your own children without fear of banishment.

No one, basically, because about 80 percent of the Star Wars Community denies to view Episode III for what it is for. And I am only justifying the great depth of Revenge of the Sith, not the prequels as a whole (although they did connect the puzzles towards Episode III wonderfully). The Original Trilogy also had a lot of problems themselves such as the Emperor and Lord Vader's absence of sensing the presence of Vader's lost children and the remaining Jedi through the usage of the force, or what about an 18-year old (with the slightest of experience compared to the other pilots) being the only one diminishing the terrifying Death Star. Do I even need to go on about the wide variety of clumsy Storm Troopers being outsmarted by hairy Tarzans? Although the Originals provides a great story, they have issues just as much as the Prequels had. The only reason why the Prequels are bashed mostly about is because it is a recent addition to the Star Wars saga, I have 10 dollars that you will be one (among many) complaining how J.J. Abrams is a poor sci-fi director while regretting Disney ever produced Episode VII.

Lol, Luke was an exact, whiny teenager that complained all assignments his uncle gave to him and couldnt care less about his own relatives he supposedly cared for and loved (evident by his reaction to their deaths). The only part of the trilogy I felt true emotion is Darth Vader informing Luke that he is his father and the victory of the Battle of Endor.

Obviously, you need to remind yourself that the Prequels were created to introduce Star Wars to a new generation for the sake of their own survival, not for the discrepancy of the average, adult fan. George Lucas did try to lessen the CGI and use the same effects he has in the Originals, but it all resulted in a major backlash that proved outdated (i.e. Episode I). George had to use CGI to express the beauty of the Republic before the awful totalitarian state of the Empire. He had to express how beautiful and glorious the Republic was to root for the wonders and liberties democracy brought towards this universe. How was he supposed to create this beautiful, great republic with the same effects used in the Original Trilogy? CGI was the only logical way to go, not to mention how Star Wars would be improved upon the eyes of the new generation if expressed.

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The problem is, with Anakin, I have no reason to like him or care what happens to him because he is solely portrayed as an emo kid. The bad-dialogue fest with Padme only serves to emphasize this. Maybe if I was an emo kid who felt like no one in the world liked me I could identify with him? I don't see an inner struggle, I don't see him

Nothing which he does is remotely surprising throughout the entire movie, with the exception of the first scene where he randomly cares about some clone pilot. He's reckless and acts irresponsibly and with disdain towards the Jedi Order the entire movie.

Contrast your explanations of Luke and Anakin. You give about 3 times as much explanation as to the character of Luke as you did Anakin. This is my point. Anakin's character is shallow and Luke's character is dynamic and has more of a real feel to it (though I don't know how you can claim Luke is more whiney than Anakin).

Regarding CGI, maybe it's because I grew up before every single action movie was completely CGI, but I do not find CGI and green screens the only way to show grandeur and intense battle scenes. Lots of CGI aliens fighting other CGI characters in the background is cool but ultimately might add nothing to the plot of the movie - as in the opening scene of EP III.

CGI might be cool to some but the effect at the beginning of A New Hope with just two ships was significant. You see the clear contrast between the might of the Empire and Rebellion in about 5 seconds. You don't need to see 500 star destroyers fighting 10 rebel ships to accomplish this. The relative might of the Empire is clear, with just one ship.

My guess is you are young enough to not remember the days when plot/character development was significantly more important to movies. It was harder to make a popular movie ignoring the fundamentals of theatrical writing. It was a lot harder to cover up complete lack of either with CGI or special effects. But in the past 10 years, a lot of movies have used these to compensate for terribly screen writing...

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