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Historical Changes in CyberNations


Stormsend

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What are some things over the years you would view as being better now and better back then? Something aside from the blatantly obvious like the number of players.

Over the years, CyberNations has changed a lot, community-wise. Sure, it's changed in-game, too, but that is negligible. Alliances adjust military strategies, but don't always come out on top because of it. What truly affects war and history are the relationships and power circles (or spheres) that form our coalitions. In years past, it was simple. One side versus another. You feel on the northern hemisphere of the treaty web or you fell on the southern hemisphere. Life was easier, then. You knew who your enemies were.

Over time, alliances come and go. New governments take charge. There are political coups, changes in friendships and changes in tactical relationships. Most of all, people change.

So, what happened to the LUE-NAAC/NPO-NpO days? Well, one side was victorious and the sphere of the other began to collapse. Out of the chaos of such collapses, new powers rise. All of a sudden, treaty blocs begin to individualize. They get their own spheres of influenece. It's slow at first, but the changes it caused were drastic. Enter the Unjust War.

Everything changed. Alliances that were seen as lapdogs to the NPO, like GOONS, suddenly on the opposite side of Pacifica. Now we enter the era of blocs. In this era, we see treaty blocs become more and more common as alliances realize everyone is out for themselves in the end. Taking hold of a sphere of influence is vital. The idea of friendship enters the mainstream again. We see Superfriends, Complaints and Grievances, The Citadel, The Continuum and we suddenly get the big picture: No longer are alliances as allies enough, you need blocs as allies! Blocs contain several alliances, and alliances contain several treaties. The math is simple.

So, another war. Then another. And, finally, the dissolution of the New Pacific Order's sphere of influence. We enter our own Three Kingdoms period: Complaints and Grievances, Superfriends and The Order of the Paradox. Then comes our Battle of Red Cliffs, where, historically, Wu and Shu teamed up against Wei. In this case Superfriends and Complaints & Grievances take on The Order of the Paradox. The historical parallels aside line up, and the war is won for this alliance of C&G and SF.

Times have changed again. Blocs are separating and re-aligning. There are some who have tasted power and been drunk by it. There are some who finally have it. And, there are some shooting for it.

This is great. War is a little less frequent, but studying all this politically, it's truly fascinating. So, right now, politics is at its best. There is no clue where things will end up by the time the next war comes around because people will make their judgments on what side of a war works best for them. However, that is also what makes this time tremendously more boring than the old days. We don't fight as quickly. We wait and wait for the opportunity. And as more people hesitate due to fear of repercussions, the longer it takes.

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You are simplifying the past and complicating the present in order to view a political progression where none exists. What you describe of the modern power-seeking alliance has always been the case. Even in early 2006 politics and allegiances were in constant flux. Who can forget Legion's sudden change of side in the Great Patriotic War, for example, or GATO's oscillations prior to that.

The same was true throughout the following 5 years, as no power structure was without the constant threat of alliances or groups of alliances switching allegiance or conducting some other power-seeking behaviour (FAN throughout early 2007, the UjP prior to the UjW, etc).

You smooth over all of this to view previous eras as full of the primitive politics of unity and 'lapdogs', but in reality this was never more than propaganda from both side. All alliances have their own interests and the means for achieving them can change in an instant.

You ignore these perhaps because they are single alliances, but back then an alliance was as significant as a bloc is today, due to the smaller numbers and thus greater political and military weight that one could hold alone.

And so we get to the heart of the matter -- what has actually changed is simply the number of alliances. This has necessitated bloc politics (as the number of voices increased one had to become louder) and has, as I noted all the way back in 2008, made war more difficult to come by.

Thus while more moving parts necessarily means less wars, the underlying principles of political discourse and activity remain unchanged. No political progression, just a slightly different context within which they operate.

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Vlad's post

So what you are basically saying is that back in the day single alliances carried enough power to control things or at least move other alliances their way now it is the time for blocs. The Blocs of today are like large alliances of the past. Not many alliances back in early times, so now with so many alliances on bob, blocs do today what single alliances like NPO could do back then.

I wasn't here back in the early days but I've seen some numbers and spreadsheets of old coalition wars and many alliances were bringing 500+ nations some 1000 nations. Do you guys see those days returning ever?

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There is actually a pretty well-defined story arc that starts in 2006 with the First Great War and ends at the conclusion of the Karma War. NPO was at the center of that story arc. Certainly there have been a number of sideshows along the way, but the theme of NPO meeting early challenges (2006-early 2007), the dominance of NPO as it made and remade coalitions with various alliances (2007-2009), and its eventual fall from power kept players and fans of the game entertained for an extended period.

The problem has been the past year or so that no one really knew what was next. The answer initially seemed to be, "keep the Hegemony from rising again." That's not much of a story arc, particularly when the "bad guy" doesn't want to be the bad guy any more.

So now here we are, with some threads of possible story lines laying about, but nothing that you can say, "this is how the game will progress for the next 2-3 years". Sometimes a blank page is worse than a page that already has been filled in.

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So what you are basically saying is that back in the day single alliances carried enough power to control things or at least move other alliances their way now it is the time for blocs. The Blocs of today are like large alliances of the past. Not many alliances back in early times, so now with so many alliances on bob, blocs do today what single alliances like NPO could do back then.

Basically, yes.

I wasn't here back in the early days but I've seen some numbers and spreadsheets of old coalition wars and many alliances were bringing 500+ nations some 1000 nations. Do you guys see those days returning ever?

Not without massive changes to the laws of our physical universe. What gave Bob its massive surge in growth between the GPW and GW3 were invasions from other universes (GOONS, FAN, Genmay, Fark, etc, etc). These have now largely exhausted themselves and they won't reinvade the same space twice so long as it stays broadly the same.

Do you have a scottish accent Vlad? Because we might need to have you on as a guest host.

While I concur with your premise that I am awesome, I do not currently have the means to provide an audio version of my wisdom.

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There is actually a pretty well-defined story arc that starts in 2006 with the First Great War and ends at the conclusion of the Karma War. NPO was at the center of that story arc. Certainly there have been a number of sideshows along the way, but the theme of NPO meeting early challenges (2006-early 2007), the dominance of NPO as it made and remade coalitions with various alliances (2007-2009), and its eventual fall from power kept players and fans of the game entertained for an extended period.

The problem has been the past year or so that no one really knew what was next. The answer initially seemed to be, "keep the Hegemony from rising again." That's not much of a story arc, particularly when the "bad guy" doesn't want to be the bad guy any more.

So now here we are, with some threads of possible story lines laying about, but nothing that you can say, "this is how the game will progress for the next 2-3 years". Sometimes a blank page is worse than a page that already has been filled in.

I like this post, I really do.

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