Jump to content






Photo
- - - - -

The "real" Coffee

Posted by jerdge , 20 March 2012 · 117 views

For reason unbeknownst to myself I've been developing this desire to explain how you do the "real" Coffee (as I see it). And here we are!

First of all, you need a "Moka" coffee pot, i.e. something like this thing:

Posted Image


How you do it, tricks and newbs mistakes included:

  • [Newb mistake] You don't get an aluminum pot. You get a stainless steel pot.
    (Strangely enough, aluminum will oxidize and develop stains that will alter the flavour of your coffee: never go for aluminum, get the steel.)
  • Use 100% Arabica coffee only.
  • [Trick] When you first purchase the pot, prepare your coffee (read the following), then throw it away. Wash (see #4), repeat and throw it away again. Drink from the third one on.
  • [Newb mistake] You never wash the pot with detergents. Fresh water only. Detergents would wipe away the coffee traces from the interior of the pot, and your coffee would develop an unpleasant metallic taste.
    (Don't worry about "hygiene": your pot gets sterilized at every use - T = 100 C: no bacteria/virus can survive.)
  • [Trick] Don't wash the pot after each use, but just before each use.
  • Start preparing your pot by washing it with fresh water. [Trick] Use cold water for the water tank (A).
  • Fill the tank with [trick] cold (tap/fridge) water, to just below the level of the safety valve.
  • Fill the filter (B) with grinded coffee. (Do not use soluble coffee for heaven's sake!)
  • [Newb mistake] Do not press the grinded coffee. You may gently shake the filter for the coffee to get evenly distributed.
  • Screw the top (C) over the filter and tank, and close it tightly, without pushing on the handle.
  • [Trick] Put the pot on the smallest flame/heater of your kitchen cooker, and set it at the lowest possible intensity (you want your water to be heated slowly). You may try to experiment a bit with higher intensities, but never go with the highest ones (or your coffee will have a burnt taste).
  • When the coffee will start filling the top you'll hear a distinct noise. You can turn off the cooker then, or wait a few moments, but anyway remove the coffee from the heat source before the boiling starts (boiled coffee is meh.)
  • [Trick] if your pot is large (over the size of 1-2 cups) stir the coffee to mix it well before pouring it out.
  • If you don't plan to use the pot for a lot of time (20+ days) wash it (again with fresh water only). Repeat #4 before using it again.

I might have forgotten something obvious: in that case please point it out for me (Cerridwyn: thanks in advance for your inevitable "peer-review"... ;) )

And now excuse me but I leave to have a cup of coffee... :D




"Use 100% Arabica coffee only."

Why?
Because it tastes better... (It's subjective, I know.)
Yeah, I see it's subjective, but robusta wouldn't even be in market if there wasn't a reason to use it. A lot of people use different blends of both.
"C. arabica contains less caffeine than any other commercially cultivated species of coffee." - Wikipedia

So another coffee might be better if you're not just drinking it for taste, but want a stronger boost from it.
Photo
New Frontier
Mar 21 2012 12:08 AM
I'm a press man, myself.

"C. arabica contains less caffeine than any other commercially cultivated species of coffee." - Wikipedia

So another coffee might be better if you're not just drinking it for taste, but want a stronger boost from it.


It's more bitter and cheaper too. Not everyone wants the softer taste of arabica.

"C. arabica contains less caffeine than any other commercially cultivated species of coffee." - Wikipedia
So another coffee might be better if you're not just drinking it for taste, but want a stronger boost from it.

On the other hand you can drink more Arabica coffee without assuming too much caffeine, or drink the same amount and assume less caffeine (some people should avoid/reduce the amount of caffeine they assume).

Anyway yes, the Arabica preference isn't "universal", it's just how I like to drink it. I can live with Robusta drinkers... :)
I usually stick with Turkish myself, but I see the value in a good filtered coffee.
What happens when you press on the handle?

I am not a coffee drinker myself, but had a roommate that worked at Starbucks for a long time. His primary concern for coffee makers was that they use a metal filter, because paper filters apparently absorb too many oils present in the coffee slurry mixture (not sure what to call unfiltered coffee). Does your coffee pot Moka style require paper filters?

Long live hot chocolate!
Pressing on the handle might break/loose it in the long run. You could also close it too tightly and later have to apply a lot of force to open it up again (operation which too can compromise the handle).

The "Moka" coffee pot requires loose coffee, which you usually put in the filter using a teaspoon. Any kind of "pre-packed" filter is a big no no.
Alternately use a Keurig and avoid most of the hassle altogether. :P
I'm a fan of the Ethiopian in a press pot.

Mmm, those Italian's sure know their coffee, though.
Photo
Alfred von Tirpitz
Mar 25 2012 03:59 AM
Filter Coffee for me, its the best.
I forgot to add: sugar kills it taste.
turkish coffee
microscopic pinch of salt reduces bitterness. old military secret there.

September 2014

S M T W T F S
 1 2 3456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930    

Recent Entries

Recent Comments

Categories